Wraparound Tools (Comprehensive)

Wraparound Tools for System Leadership | Updated April 2020

(Click on title to access PDF or website.)

The following are WraparoundOhio resources for all individuals involved in recovery in the areas of mental health, substance use, behavioral health, judicial justice, and trauma. The materials range from research articles on systems of care to intervention and sustainability tools designed for youth, their parents and families, their clinicians and communities, supervisors and system leaders, advocates and funders.


Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS)
Founded in 1998, the primary work of the Praed Foundation is in support of a mass collaboration of individuals who seek to use evidence-based assessments as an approach to working together to maintain the focus of human service enterprise on the people they serve. The Foundation has a variety of projects that supports its mission including managing flexible funding for youth with mental health needs in the juvenile justice system. Their tools include Child & Adolescent Needs and Strengths, the Family Advocacy and Support Tool, the Crisis Assessment Tool, and the Adult Needs and Strengths Assessment.


Adult Needs and Strengths Assessment –Transition
The Adult Needs and Strengths Assessment (ANSA) is a multi-purpose tool developed for adult’s behavioral health services to support decision making, including level of care and service planning, to facilitate quality improvement initiatives, and to allow for the monitoring of outcomes of services. The ANSA is currently used in a number of states and Canada in applications hospitals, emergency departments, psycho-social rehabilitation programs, and ACT programs. The CANS was developed from a communication perspective so as to facilitate the linkage between the assessment process and the design of individualized service plans including the application of evidence-based practices.


Funding Effective Financing Strategies
A study conducted by The Research and Training Center for Children’s Mental Health (RTC) at the University of South Florida examined financing strategies used by states, communities, and tribes to support the infrastructure, services, and supports that comprise systems of care. The study of effective financing practices for systems of care was initiated in October 2004 and was conducted jointly by the RTC, the Human Service Collaborative of Washington, DC, the National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health at Georgetown University, and Family Support Systems, Inc. of Arizona. The study was supported with federal funding from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the Department of Education and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).


Tiered Care Coordination Expert Convening Meeting Summary
Definitions of care coordination vary across implementation settings, and after review of almost forty unique characterizations of care coordination, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality settled on the following description: “Care coordination is the deliberate organization of patient care activities between two or more participants (including the patient) involved in a patient’s care to facilitate the appropriate delivery of health care services. Organizing care involves the marshaling of personnel and other resources needed to carry out all required patient care activities, and is often managed by the exchange of information among participants responsible for different aspects of care.

Also, along these lines of possible interest and use, Financing Evidence-Based Programs and Practices: Changing Systems to Support Effective Service. | View and Download Here |


Clinical Decision Making Approaches for Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health Care
Over nearly a decade, beginning in 1995, the Health Care Reform Tracking Project (HCRTP) tracked publicly financed managed care initiatives, principally Medicaid managed care, and their impact on children with mental health and substance abuse (i.e. behavioral health) disorders and their families. Given the opportunity for improvement in both the overall service systems available to families and in the selection of appropriate services and supports for individual children and adolescents, it continues to be timely to take a look at what some of the state and local entities with the most specified processes are finding in their search for useful supports to clinical decision-making at all levels of the system. The HCRTP was conducted jointly by the Research and Training Center for Children’s Mental Health at the University of South Florida, the Human Service Collaborative of Washington, D.C. and the National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health at Georgetown University.


Transition-Age Youth
Transition-age youth are adolescents and young adults (ages 14-25) who have a diagnosable mental illness that has led to impaired functioning in one or more life domains. Examples of life domains include housing, education and employment, quality of life and functioning and life skills Developmentally, transition-age youth are interdependent, seeking their own identity and independence while still partially dependent on the support of family members, caregivers and service providers. Best practices for serving transition-age youth incorporate the principles of recovery, resiliency and cultural competence. In addition, overall care must be youth-guided and family-driven.


Does Team-Based Planning ‘Work’ for Adolescents? | Studies of Wraparound
This article focuses on wraparound as an example of a team-planning process, and uses data from several sources to reflect on questions about whether – and under what conditions – collaborative teams are successful in engaging young people – and their caregivers – in planning. Data used was collected in three studies to address research questions. The first data set comes from a study on wraparound service planning in Nevada, examining data collected from 23 matched pairs of caregivers and youth at 6 months after wraparound planning began. Second data set came from a national study of 41 local wraparound programs throughout the United States. The third data set comes from the pilot test of the Achieve My Plan! intervention.

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process
“Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process” focuses on what needs to happen in wraparound; however, how the work is accomplished is equally important. Merely accomplishing the tasks is insufficient unless this work is done in a manner consistent with the 10 principles of wraparound. In addition, future work from the National Wraparound Initiative will provide more detailed information about team member skills that are necessary for the wraparound process, as well as descriptions of specific procedures, templates, and other tools that can be used to complete the activities described.


Promoting Successful Transitions for Youth with Serious Mental Health Conditions
This webinar was presented on October 8, 2014 by Mary Wagner, Ph.D and Lynn Newman, Ed.D, sponsored by the Transitions Research and Training Center at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. It provides a national picture of youth who received special education services in high school in the category of emotional disturbance regarding: post-high school employment; participation in post-secondary education; factors related to an increased likelihood of employment and post-secondary education up to eight years after high school; longitudinal patterns of productive engagement in employment and/or post-secondary education up to four years post-high school and predictors of engagement and disengagement.


The Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc.
A nonprofit policy center dedicated to improving the health of low-income Americans. Since 1995, the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) has partnered with nearly every state in the country to promote innovations in publicly financed health care, especially for individuals with complex, high-cost needs. Its work brings together state and federal agencies, health plans, providers, and consumer groups to advance models of organizing, financing, and delivering health care services. In so doing, it has developed both a birds-eye view and a ground-level feel for the nation’s health care delivery system for low-income Americans and a unique perspective on how to generate systems-level change within Medicaid and across public and private payers.


Wraparound Evaluation & Research Team
The Wraparound Evaluation and Research Team seeks to improve the lives of children and their families through research on the implementation and outcomes of the Wraparound process. Through development, refinement and dissemination of the Wraparound Fidelity Assessment System, our team aims to assist implementation of the Wraparound process, evaluate effectiveness, identify the need for technical assistance and training, and promote communication within the service delivery and research and evaluation fields.


National Wraparound Initiative (NWI)
The NWI envisions a future in which all children and youth, regardless of the complexity of their needs, are connected to caring adults and have access to appropriate services and supports so they can be healthy, experience positive development, and live and thrive in their homes and communities. Since 2004, the National Wraparound Initiative has worked to promote understanding about the components and benefits of care coordination using the Wraparound practice model, and to provide the field with resources and guidance that facilitate high quality and consistent Wraparound implementation.


National Wraparound Implementation Center (NWIC)
The National Wraparound Implementation Center (NWIC) supports states, communities, and organizations to implement Wraparound effectively. NWIC uses innovative approaches grounded in implementation science and incorporating cutting-edge strategies to support Wraparound implementation. NWIC provides support that is intensive yet affordable. The work is focused on building sustainable local capacity to provide model-adherent, high fidelity Wraparound, thereby increasing positive outcomes for children, youth, and their families.


Building Systems of Care Primer
Building systems of care is inherently a strategic process. Webster’s Dictionary defines strategic planning as “the science and art of mobilizing all forces—political, economic, financial, psychological—to obtain goals and objectives.” This terminology comes out of warfare! It assumes that there is clarity about goals and objectives. Creating that clarity and mobilizing “all forces” are key roles that system builders play. This document provides a strategic framework to support system builders in these roles by: Reviewing the history, values, principles, and operational characteristics of systems of care to create a context for system building: Exploring many of the functions that require structure in systems of care; Discussing examples and the pros and cons of various structural arrangements to promote improved outcomes for children, youth, and families involved, or at risk for involvement, in multiple systems; and • Describing and providing examples of effective system-building processes.


Crisis Text Line
The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) has entered in to a contract with the national Crisis Text Line to provide Ohioans with a state-specific keyword to access its free, confidential service available 24/7 via text on mobile devices. This new resource is intended to broaden the options available through current community crisis hotlines. Throughout Ohio, individuals can text the keyword “4hope” to 741 741 to be connected to a Crisis Counselor. This keyword was originally chosen by the Stark County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery Board and will now be available statewide through this partnership.


Strengthening Family Support for Young People with Mental Health Needs in the Transition to Adulthood: A Tip Sheet for Service Provider
This tip sheet for service providers was produced by Pathways Transition Training Collaborative, Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University in Oregon. It is designed to strengthen family support in the transition to adulthood, service providers need to be able to: Articulate the value to young people of having family members involved in services; involve families of all diversities in supporting their young adult children to achieve their goals; navigate the legal and policy contexts that affect families’ involvement in the transition years; and call upon Family Support Organizations and Parent Advocates to support families in the transition years. Project funded by National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research, United States Department of Education, and the Center for Mental Health Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, United States Department of Health and Human Services.


Wraparound Tools for Families

(Click on title to access PDF or website.)

ENGAGE Transition Tool Kit for Families
If you are reading this, you are likely helping a teen or young adult transition to independence. You are likely one of us — a parent, family member, partner, or youth. You don’t have to do this alone! There are professionals and family members willing to help. The information contained here comes from experience and research — it is not legal advice. We are not legal experts. This comes from our desire to help you avoid some of the problems we’ve encountered as we’ve helped our kids move into adulthood. This is current as of September, 2016. We’ve done our best to give you links so you can verify and find updated material since things do change over time. It is our hope that this toolkit saves you time and frustration in your journey.


The Family-Run Executive Director Leadership Association (FREDLA)
The Family Run Executive Director Leadership Association (FREDLA) serves as the national representative and advocate for family-run organizations and their executive directors, and supports effective stewardship of family-run organizations. FREDLA informs its members on current and emerging policy issues, provides education on research and other program findings and best practices, provides or facilitates professional development opportunities and other consultation and technical assistance, collaborate with stakeholders and facilitates peer-to-peer sharing across member family-run organizations. FREDLA’s mission is to empower and strengthen executive leaders of family-run organizations focused on the well-being of children and youth with mental health, emotional or behavioral challenges and their families.


National Federation for Children’s Mental Health
The National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health is a national family-run organization linking more than 120 chapters and state organizations focused on the issues of children and youth with emotional, behavioral, or mental health needs and their families. Emotional, behavioral or mental health needs cut across all income, educational, geographical, racial, ethnic, and religious groups. They are found among single parents and two-parent families and in birth, adoptive, and foster families. The National Federation works to develop and implement policies, legislation, funding mechanisms, and service systems that utilize the strengths of families. Its emphasis on advocacy offers families a voice in the formation of national policy, services and supports for children with mental health needs and their families.

The National Directory of Family-Run & Youth-Guided Organizations for Children’s Behavioral Health
The directory lists family-run and youth-guided organizations and support groups throughout the United States, US Territories and Tribal Nations. You can search our database to find organizations across the country run by families or youth consumers that are working to support families who have children and adolescents with behavioral health challenges and to improve behavioral health services and supports. Behavioral health services include mental health and substance abuse services. The Directory provides contact information for family and youth organizations and support groups seeking to connect with other family and youth organizations; assists families and youth in locating other organizations’ websites; helps families, system of care planners, and practitioners to identify existing family-run and youth-guided organizations and the types of services and supports provided; and, provides the latest and most accurate information on family-run and youth-guided organizations whose focus is on children’s behavioral health issues.


Quick Guide for Self-Assessment for Family-Run Organizations in Systems of Care
The Quick Guide is for use by family-run organizations. The guide is divided into nine sections addressing important elements of family-run organization development and sustainability. Each section represents several components or characteristics of effective family-run organizations in a system of care. A brief description of the element and its components and characteristics is presented at the beginning of each section. The description is followed by exercises designed to help you, as a family-run organization representative or team, begin your self-assessment and planning in that area.


Youth M.O.V.E. National
Youth M.O.V.E National is a youth led national organization devoted to improving services and systems that support positive growth and development by uniting the voices of individuals who have lived experience in various systems including mental health, juvenile justice, education, and child welfare. The members of Youth M.O.V.E. National work as a diverse collective to unite the voices and causes of youth while raising awareness around youth issues. We will advocate for youth rights and voice in mental health and the other systems that serve them, for the purpose of empowering youth to be equal partners in the process of change.


Youth M.O.V.E. Ohio
Youth M.O.V.E. Ohio is a youth led organization devoted to improving services and systems to support youth inclusion, mental wellness, positive supports and healthy transition. YouthMOVE Ohio empowers youth to advocate for themselves and live healthy, meaningful lives. Our vision is a world where youth are respected for their experience and given the tools and supports they need to succeed. YouthMOVE Ohio advocates for youth rights and youth voices at a national, state and local level. We empower youth to be equal partners in the processes that impact them and offer support and guidance.


Girls Health.Gov
The site gives girls reliable, useful information on the health issues they will face as they become young women, and tips on handling relationships with family and friends, at school and at home. Their tagline is “Be Happy. Be Healthy. Be You. Beautiful.” It focuses on the idea that being yourself—finding what makes you smile and how to live well—is what makes you “you.” And that is beautiful.


Wraparound Tools for Supervisors

(Click on title to access PDF or website.)

Ohio Wraparound Coaching Supervision-Level Target Descriptions: Contribute to effective community context/nest for Wraparound.
This guide provides descriptions of supervisions-level targets, including: Working to create a healthy nest for Wraparound in the community systems; working with facilitators to promote a healthy nest for Wraparound in the community systems; engaging in active system problem solving activities related to Wraparound and System of Care; providing regular training and shadowing opportunities for employees to build their foundation of skills; providing regular coaching opportunities for staff to reflect on and build their skill level within the process; promoting professional growth and integration of the model into daily practice; understanding and being trained in the Wraparound philosophy; supporting facilitators through reflective supervision and using tools that help facilitators reflect and adapt; and being  able to clearly communicate the Wraparound process and philosophy.


Ohio Wraparound Coaching Practice-Level Target Descriptions: Effective partnering and positioning of the facilitator with family and team members
This guide provides descriptions of supervisions-level targets, including: Ability to ensure that the young adult, parents and caregivers are valued as critical partners in the team planning process; ability to foster relationships of trust and collaboration among all team members; ability to develop consensus and shared accountability among team members around team mission; guiding team members to hear family concerns and desires and to accept family as full and equal partners; ability to invite people to meetings in way that addresses their self interest in participating;and ability to guide the team in crafting a plan that has a mix of formal services, adapted services, tailored interventions and supportive connections. 

Rethinking Wraparound: Proposing a New Construct to Support an Evolving Understanding of the Wraparound Approach
The goal of this article is not to describe a specific version of what Wraparound practice should be, but rather to propose a new construct to help Wraparound practitioners hone their approaches and improve the impact of their efforts to assist families. The National Wraparound Initiative website defines Wraparound as “an intensive holistic method of engaging with individuals with complex needs (most typically children, youth and their families) so that they can live in their homes and communities and realize their hopes and dreams.” The NWI website goes on to state: “Since the term was first coined in the 1980s, ‘wraparound’ has been defined in different ways. It has been described as a philosophy, an approach and a service. In recent years, wraparound has been most commonly conceived of as an intensive, individualized care planning and management process. In the spirit of the continuing evolution in our understanding of what Wraparound is we have developed an updated definition that reflects a slightly different point of emphasis.

The Needs Guide: A resource for families, facilitators and team members working with the Wraparound process
Wraparound is a complex process when you put all of the pieces together. Each of the core concepts of Wraparound can be hard to implement. For example, getting a team together to come up with a single plan of care is easier said than done. Staying focused on strengths while struggling with the behavior of a teenager can be a challenge for any Wraparound team. Staying focused on a common outcome can also be challenging. Despite these challenges most individuals associated with Wraparound find that they can manage if not master core Wraparound concepts such as Team, Plan of Care, Strengths or Outcomes. The most difficult Wraparound concept is that of Needs. This Workbook is designed to help all individuals who are working with Wraparound to become comfortable with the concept of needs as used in the Wraparound process. It is also designed to help individuals and teams work better at identifying the underlying needs, reaching agreement about the most important need and staying focused on addressing and meeting those needs.

Benchmarking in Wraparound
Find the easiest counts for success; engage in bi-level benchmarking; manage to the initial conditions that got the family referred; engage the family in identifying benchmarks that create meaning in each day; manage to the facts; summarize to the positives; bring information to the team for review; use logic in reviewing benchmarks at a team level; and builds discipline for team decision making rather than crowd decision making.


The Wraparound Process User’s Guide
This step-by-step tutorial provides an overview of the Wraparound System of Care as well as implementation guidelines that are at the heart of Ohio’s SAMHSA System of Care Expansion initiative seeking to expand System of Care statewide focusing on youth, young adults in transition, their care givers and families. A system of care is a spectrum of effective, community-based services and supports for children and youth with mental health challenges and their families, that is coordinated, built on meaningful partnerships with families and youth, and addresses cultural and linguistic needs to help them function better at home, in school, at work, in the community, and throughout life.


How and Why Does Wraparound Work | A Theory of Change
Wraparound has always had implicit associations with various psychosocial theories, however, until recently only preliminary efforts had been undertaken to explain in a thorough manner why the wraparound process should produce desired outcomes. The Wraparound theory assumes that, when wraparound is undertaken in accordance with the principles and the practice model specified by the NWI, the result is an effective team process that capitalizes on the expertise and commitment of all team members while also prioritizing the perspectives of the youth and family. When the wraparound process is carried out with fidelity to the principles and the practice model, it is an engagement and planning process that promotes a blending of perspectives and high-quality problem solving.

Ten Principles of the Wraparound Process
The philosophical principles of wraparound have long provided the basis for understanding this innovative and widely-practiced service delivery model. This value base for working in collaboration and partnership with families extends from wraparound’s roots in programs such as Kaleidoscope in Chicago, the Alaska Youth Initiative, and Project Wraparound in Vermont. In 1999, a monograph on wraparound was published that presented 10 core elements of wraparound, as well as 10 practice principles, from the perspective of wraparound innovators. For many, these original elements and principles became the best means available for understanding the wraparound process. They also provided an important basis for initial efforts at measuring wraparound fidelity.


Harnessing the Power of Young People and Social Media | Today’s Tools to Break Down the Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness and Substance Abuse
Is it possible to bridge the growing health information and communication gap? Yes! By harnessing the power of the young people in our middle schools, high schools, and universities who are already on social media sites and have amazing skills for video creation, Web site design, photography, marketing, and tweeting that reaches their own generation. Healthcare organizations do not need to spend money and time training their current staff to learn to use social media, they simply need to recruit and welcome the younger generation to serve on their boards and committees as well as on their staff as volunteers, interns, and employees.


Achieve My Plan | Youth Participation Research Summary
Human service and educational agencies often convene teams to work collaboratively on plans for serving children or youth. This happens most often for children and youth who are involved with multiple systems or who are felt to be in need of intensive support. Often, these are children and adolescents with cognitive, emotional, behavioral, physical, or learning challenges. Contained in this PDF are some common questions that people might have about youth participation in education, care, treatment, or service planning. Information from published research is summarized to help answer each question. We provide references so that if you are interested, you can get more details from the original sources.


Wraparound and Natural Supports
The Wraparound theory assumes that, when wraparound is undertaken in accordance with the principles and the practice model specified by the NWI, the result is an effective team process that capitalizes on the expertise and commitment of all team members while also prioritizing the perspectives of the youth and family…When the wraparound process is carried out with fidelity to the principles and the practice model, it is an engagement and planning process that promotes a blending of perspectives and high-quality problem solving, and is thus consistent with empirically supported best practices for effective teamwork…As a wraparound trainer and coach, I support facilitators as they learn the craft of wraparound.


TIP Model Definition & Guidelines
The Transition to Independence Process (TIP) model was developed for working with youth and young adults (14-29 years old) with emotional/behavioral difficulties (EBD) to engage them in their own futures planning process and provide them with developmentally-appropriate, non stigmatizing, culturally-competent, trauma-informed, and appealing services and supports. The TIP model is operationalized through seven guidelines and their associated practices that drive the work with young people to improve their outcomes and provide a transition system that is responsive to their families.


Does Team-Based Planning ‘Work’ for Adolescents? | Studies of Wraparound
This article focuses on wraparound as an example of a team planning process, and uses data from several sources to reflect on questions about whether-and under what conditions-collaborative teams are successful in engaging young people-and their caregivers-in planning. We used data collected in three studies to address our research questions. The first data set comes from a study on wraparound service planning in Nevada. We examined data collected from 23 matched pairs of caregivers and youth at 6 months after wraparound planning began. Our second data set came from a national study of 41 local wraparound programs throughout the United States.


Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process
“Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process” focuses on what needs to happen in wraparound; however, how the work is accomplished is equally important. Merely accomplishing the tasks is insufficient unless this work is done in a manner consistent with the 10 principles of wraparound. In addition, future work from the National Wraparound Initiative will provide more detailed information about team member skills that are necessary for the wraparound process, as well as descriptions of specific procedures, templates, and other tools that can be used to complete the activities described.


Promoting Successful Transitions for Youth with Serious Mental Health Conditions
This webinar was presented on October 8, 2014 by Mary Wagner, Ph.D and Lynn Newman, Ed.D, sponsored by the Transitions Research and Training Center at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. It provides a national picture of youth who received special education services in high school in the category of emotional disturbance regarding: Post-high school employment; participation in post-secondary education; factors related to an increased likelihood of employment and post-secondary education up to eight years after high school; longitudinal patterns of productive engagement in employment and/or post-secondary education up to four years post-high school and predictors of engagement and disengagement.


Wraparound Tools for Facilitators

(Click on title to access PDF or website.)

Rethinking Wraparound: Proposing a New Construct to Support an Evolving Understanding of the Wraparound Approach
The goal of this article is not to describe a specific version of what Wraparound practice should be – as if there was only one answer to that question, but rather to propose a new construct to help Wraparound practitioners hone their approaches and improve the impact of their efforts to assist families.


The Needs Guide: A resource for families, facilitators and team members working with the Wraparound process
Wraparound is a complex process when you put all of the pieces together. Each of the core concepts of Wraparound can be hard to implement. For example, getting a team together to come up with a single plan of care is easier said than done. Staying focused on strengths while struggling with the behavior of a teenager can be a challenge for any Wraparound team. Staying focused on a common outcome can also be challenging. Despite these challenges most individuals associated with Wraparound find that they can manage if not master core Wraparound concepts such as Team, Plan of Care, Strengths or Outcomes. The most difficult Wraparound concept is that of Needs. This Workbook is designed to help all individuals who are working with Wraparound to become comfortable with the concept of needs as used in the Wraparound process. It is also designed to help individuals and teams work better at identifying the underlying needs, reaching agreement about the most important need and staying focused on addressing and meeting those needs.


Benchmarking in Wraparound
Find the easiest counts for success; engage in bi-level benchmarking; manage to the initial conditions that got the family referred; engage the family in identifying benchmarks that create meaning in each day; manage to the facts; summarize to the positives; bring information to the team for review; use logic in reviewing benchmarks at a team level; and builds discipline for team decision making rather than crowd decision making.


Strategic Sharing Workbook
This workbook is for individuals who have experienced traumatic life experiences and are interested in sharing their stories in an effort to promote change. Training in Strategic Sharing is an important part of advocacy – we encourage anyone who has experienced traumatic life events and wishes to share those experiences in an effort to promote positive changes for yourself and/or others, to do so with the help of this guide. As you will see mentioned several times in this workbook, it is really important that you take the time to take care of yourself. This training was not developed to help anyone overcome aspects of trauma; it was created to help individuals avoid retraumatization when sharing their traumatic experiences with others. So we encourage everyone using this workbook to either continue with your mental health services or to seek out mental health supports.


Best Practices for Achieving Meaningful Youth Participation
Human service and educational agencies and systems often convene teams to work collaboratively on plans for serving children or youth. This is particularly true for children and youth who are involved with multiple systems or who are felt to be in need of intensive intervention. These kinds of planning teams include IEP (Individualized Education Plan) teams, wraparound teams, foster care Independent Living Program teams, transition planning teams, youth/family decision teams, and other teams that create service or treatment plans. Unfortunately, it is often true that these plans are created for youth, with little input or buy-in from the young people themselves.


Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process
“Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process” focuses on what needs to happen in wraparound; however, how the work is accomplished is equally important. Merely accomplishing the tasks is insufficient unless this work is done in a manner consistent with the 10 principles of wraparound. In addition, future work from the National Wraparound Initiative will provide more detailed information about team member skills that are necessary for the wraparound process, as well as descriptions of specific procedures, templates, and other tools that can be used to complete the activities described.


Promoting Successful Transitions for Youth with Serious Mental Health Conditions
This webinar was presented on October 8, 2014 by Mary Wagner, Ph.D and Lynn Newman, Ed.D, sponsored by the Transitions Research and Training Center at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. It provides a national picture of youth who received special education services in high school in the category of emotional disturbance regarding: Post-high school employment; participation in post-secondary education; factors related to an increased likelihood of employment and post-secondary education up to eight years after high school; longitudinal patterns of productive engagement in employment and/or post-secondary education up to four years post-high school and predictors of engagement and disengagement.


Red Treehouse
Redtreehouse.org was created to provide a welcoming and vibrant online community for families and professionals to explore resources to help children and young adults, prenatal through age 25. Red Treehouse established its roots in a partnership between Ohio Family and Children First (OFCF) and the Ronald McDonald House® of Cleveland, Inc. (RMH). OFCF, founded in 1993, is a partnership of state and local government, communities and families that enhances the well-being of Ohio’s children and families by building community capacity, coordinating systems and services, and engaging and empowering families.


Transition to Independence Process (TIP) and the National Network on Youth Transition (NNYT) for Behavioral Health
The National Network is the only technical assistance resource that is exclusively focused on improving practices, systems, and outcomes for transition-age youth and young adults and their families. Stars Training Academy, a division of Stars Behavioral Health Group, (SBHG) collaborates with community agencies across North America to provide enriched training and customized consultation to achieve high fidelity and sustainable implementation of evidence-supported and evidence-based practices. The Stars Training Academy serves as the purveyor of the Transition to Independence Process (TIP) Model. The National Network on Youth Transition (NNYT) is a semi-autonomous entity that is under the SBHG umbrella. NNYT is responsible for defining and applying fidelity and certification standards for the implementation and sustainability of the TIP Model.


Achieve My Plan! (AMP) | A Randomized Field-Test of Youth Engagement in Mental Health Treatment Planning
For young people aged 11.5-18 with serious mental health conditions, a comprehensive, team-based approach is increasingly seen as the preferred mechanism for creating and monitoring treatment plans. Unfortunately, the young people themselves rarely participate meaningfully in these kinds of interdisciplinary planning teams. As a result, they can become disengaged from the planning process and unmotivated to participate in the planned treatment. The Achieve My Plan! (AMP) study tested a promising intervention that was developed by researchers at Portland State University, in collaboration with young people who have mental health conditions, service providers and caregivers. The study systematically evaluated the impact of the AMP intervention on youth participation and engagement in treatment planning, youth empowerment, and youth mental health and recovery outcomes.


The Family-Run Executive Director Leadership Association (FREDLA)
The Family Run Executive Director
Leadership Association (FREDLA) serves as the national representative and advocate for family-run organizations and their executive directors, and supports effective stewardship of family-run organizations. FREDLA informs its members on current and emerging policy issues, provides education on research and other program findings and best practices, provides or facilitates professional development opportunities and other consultation and technical assistance, collaborate with stakeholders and facilitates peer-to-peer sharing across member family-run organizations. FREDLA’s mission is to empower and strengthen executive leaders of family-run organizations focused on the well-being of children and youth with mental health, emotional or behavioral challenges and their families.


Quick Guide for Self-Assessment for Family-Run Organizations in Systems of Car
The Quick Guide is for use by family-run organizations. The guide is divided into nine sections addressing important elements of family-run organization development and sustainability. Each section represents several components or characteristics of effective family-run organizations in a system of care. A brief description of the element and its components and characteristics is presented at the beginning of each section. The description is followed by exercises designed to help you, as a family-run organization representative or team, begin your self-assessment and planning in that area.


WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-5235 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106