SOC Webinars from the CIP

Webinar | A National Perspective on the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFSPA)

An Innovative Conversations Webinar with Sheila Pires
Guest Sheila Pires, Managing Partner, Human Service Collaborative​ Core Partner, National TA Network for Children’s Behavioral Health​, speaks with former CIP Director and Innovative Conversations host, Patrick Kanary present a national perspective discussing the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFSPA). It is the first installment of a two-part discussion, the second of which will explore Family First from a state-wide perspective in Ohio with Ohio specialists Carla Carpenter, Angela Sausser and Crystal Ward Allen. To listen to FFSPA Part 2, click here.

(To View Full Size Images from PowerPoint presentation, click on pic to enlarge and read.)

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, has developed a podcast initiative entitled, Innovative Conversations, exploring topics pertaining to the CIP mission of identifying promising practices and evidence-based interventions for youth dealing with mental health, substance use, trauma, and judicial justice challenges. Hosted by first CIP director Patrick Kanary, the series also examines how Wraparound Systems of Care can better facilitate how integrated treatment can help yield optimal outcomes with youth recovery.

View Innovative Conversation Webinar Session on Family First | View FFPSA Powerpoint Presentation

This session involves the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) and what it means to states funding in-home treatment and recovery for at-risk you dealing with the challenges of mental health, substance use, trauma, and judicial justice issues.

The Family First Prevention Services Act was signed into law as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act on February 9, 2018. This act reforms the federal child welfare financing streams, Title IV-E and Title IV-B of the Social Security Act, to provide services to families who are at risk of entering the child welfare system.

The bill aims to prevent children from entering foster care by allowing federal reimbursement for mental health services, substance use treatment, and in-home parenting skill training to families and children. It also seeks to improve the well-being of children already in foster care by incentivizing states to reduce placement of children in group care.

In her presentation and ensuing discussion with Patrick Kanary, Sheila Pires identifies two major related goals:​ Funding for prevention services​ and the Limits on use of congregate care​. Prevention Services​ Allows use of Title IV-E for Prevention Services and Supports (i.e., to prevent placement of children and youth into foster care and placement disruption for children/youth in adoptive or kinship guardian homes)​.

In addition, IV-E reimbursement allowed for up to 12 months for a child placed with a parent in a licensed residential family-based treatment facility for substance abuse, regardless of whether child meets AFDC income eligibility, which became effective Oct 2018​.

Prevention Services Eligibility​
Populations eligible to receive services include: 1) Parents or relatives caring for children/youth who are “candidates for foster care” – at imminent risk of entering foster care but can remain safely at home with services and supports 2) Adoptive parents and relative guardians where placement disruption is issue ​3) Youth in foster care who are pregnant or already parents and​ 4) Eligible children, youth, parents and kinship caregivers are eligible for services regardless of whether they meet the AFDC income eligibility requirements for IV-E reimbursement​.

Extending to age 23, this  supports the youth population transitioning out of foster care. It also extends to age 26 the eligibility for education and training vouchers (Chafee Foster Care Independence Program)​.

Prevention Services
​Prevention services and supports must be promising practice, supported practice, or well-supported practices, with 50% of expenditures for prevention services being  for well-supported practice​s.

Funds also can be used for training and administration related to the provision of prevention services and supports, including data collection and reporting​

Federal Match​
Between October 1, 2019 and Oct 1 2026, there is a 50% Federal IV-E match for prevention services. Beginning Sept 30 2026, Federal IV-E match for prevention services will be the same as the state’s Federal Medicaid match rate ​

Maintenance of Effort
States cannot spend less than they did in FY 2014 on prevention services, i.e., cannot substitute FFPSA dollars for state and local prevention expenditures ​

ABOUT THE PRESENTER
Sheila A. Pires is a founding partner of the Human Service Collaborative of Washington, D.C., a policy and technical assistance group specializing in child and family service systems. Ms. Pires has over 35 years of experience in national, state, and local government and non-profit agencies serving children, youth and families at risk.

She has held senior staff and management positions in the U.S. House of Representatives, the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare and the Carter White House. She co-chaired the children’s mental health and substance abuse committee of President Clinton’s Task Force on Health Care Reform and co-authored the children’s issue brief and policy recommendations for President Bush’s New Freedom Mental Health Commission.

In the Obama Administration, she was invited to present on children’s behavioral health at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Grand Rounds. She serves as the Senior Consultant to the Children in Managed Care and Child Health Quality Programs at the Center for Health Care Strategies and is a core partner of the National Technical Assistance Network for Children’s Behavioral Health, co-leading the Network’s work on policy, system design and financing.

Ms. Pires served as Deputy Commissioner of Social Services for the District of Columbia and led a reorganization of the city’s child mental health system as head of child mental health services. She has consulted with most states, as well as counties, cities, neighborhoods, foundations, and family-run organizations, and has authored numerous publications on systems change, including Building Systems of Care: A Primer.

She has served on the National Board of the Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health and currently is on the National Advisory Council of the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health. Ms. Pires received her B.A. from Boston University and a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University.

Additional Resources

Family First Prevention Services Act (P.L. 115-123)
https://comm.ncsl.org/productfiles/112498833/PPT_Christine_Calpin.pdf

FamilyFirstAct.org
https://www.familyfirstact.org/

Family First Advocacy Toolkit | American Academy of Pediatrics
https://www.familyfirstact.org/source/american-academy-pediatrics

National Conference of State Legislatures
http://www.ncsl.org/research/human-services/family-first-prevention-services-act-ffpsa.aspx

Information Memorandum on Family First (IM-18-02)​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/im1802

Program Instruction – Implementation of Title IV-E Plan Requirement​
https://www.cwla.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/ACYF-CB-PI-18-09-State-FFPSA-Prevention-PI.pdf

Child Welfare Community Letter – October 1, 2018​
https://wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Child-Welfare-Community-FFPSA.pdf

Program Instruction – State Title IV-E Prevention and Family Services and Programs​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/pi1809

Program Instruction – Tribal Title IV-E Agency Requirements for Electing Title IV-E Prevention and Family Services and Programs​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/pi1810

State Child Welfare Director Letter – January 2, 2019​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/letter-title-iv-e-prevention-clearinghouse

FamilyFirstAct.org
https://www.familyfirstact.org/

Family First Advocacy Toolkit | American Academy of Pediatrics
https://www.familyfirstact.org/source/american-academy-pediatrics


Innovative Conversation Session 7 | A State of Ohio Perspective on the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFSPA)

Guests Crystal Ward Allen, MSW, LSW, Senior Director and Strategic Consulting with Casey Family Programs, Carla Carpenter, Deputy Director of the Office of Families and Children (OFC) at the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, and Angela Sausser, Executive Director at the Public Children Services Association of Ohio, speaks with former CIP Director and Innovative Conversations host, Patrick Kanary presenting an Ohio overview discussing the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFSPA) and its impact on the state and its communities. It is the second installment of a two-part discussion, the first of which will explored Family First from a national perspective with national expert dealing with youth and families at risk, Sheila Pires, which you can listen to and experience by clicking here.

THE LAST FEW YEARS have been extremely challenging times for Ohio’s child protection services agencies. The burgeoning opioid epidemic in tandem with ongoing child protection needs, have set record increases of youths entering the foster care system.

View and Download PDF of FFPSA in Ohio Overview

Listen to A State of Ohio Perspective on the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFSPA)

 

For years, Ohio’s child protection services have been underfunded by the state, relying mainly on local levies and other resources.

(Click on pics to enlarge and view more directly.)

Nevertheless, there is reason for hope with the passage of Ohio’s biennium budget (FY 20-21) under Governor DeWine along with significant changes at the federal level of use of funding in the child protection system through the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFSPA).

View Innovative Conversation Webinar Session on Family First Part 1 | View FFPSA Powerpoint Presentation from Part 1

As studies show, kids do best in a family structure, be it biologically primary or extended family and the FFSPA allows states to focus unlimited reimbursements to states to provide in-home services for these struggling families, assistance ranging from in-home parenting skills and home-visits to mental health services, trauma recovery, and substance abuse services for care givers or adolescents.

This session of, Innovative Conversations, involves Part 2 involving the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) and what it means to states funding in-home treatment and recovery for at-risk youth dealing with the challenges of mental health, substance use, trauma, and judicial justice issues.

Ohio recently passed its FY 20-21 budget and many have observed what a child and family friendly budget this is. One area of increased support was to county children’s services authorities, raising the question: What will this increase do to improve things at the local level? What is the relationship between the state funded increases and those funds anticipated from FFPSA?

Ohio Title IV-E Waiver (ProtectOHIO)
http://jfs.ohio.gov/ocf/pohio.stm

Additional questions this Innovative Conversation session addresses include:

• What prompted the move to create this change in funding requirements?
• What does it mean that Ohio has been designated a “IV-E Waiver” state; what does this mean and how this is related to FFPSA?
• Who are the partners?
• Are families represented? What does the timeline look like?
• And what is the relationship between FFPSA and Medicaid, since both fund community-based services?
• What are the eligibility requirements for these funds? Are there specific population groups that are the focus?
• What do you see as the main opportunities here in Ohio for implementation of FFPSA? What is happening in our state that could benefit from the infusion of these funds?
• What do you see as the particular opportunities under FFSPA for child and family behavioral health? (Full disclosure here…I am on the mental health subcommittee of the state’s planning process)
• What kind of flexibility will Ohio have on what services the states wants to use this funding for? What services have already been approved via the registry?
• What do we hear from local children’s services about the emerging program priorities?
• Will there be requirements around what and how are outcomes determined or measured?
• Since the focus is on prevention and essentially community and home-based care, what restrictions are there regarding out of home placement or congregate care?
• What challenges lie ahead regarding implementation?

The Family First Prevention Services Act was signed into law as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act on February 9, 2018. This act reforms the federal child welfare financing streams, Title IV-E and Title IV-B of the Social Security Act, to provide services to families who are at risk of entering the child welfare system.

The bill aims to prevent children from entering foster care by allowing federal reimbursement for mental health services, substance use treatment, and in-home parenting skill training to families and children. It also seeks to improve the well-being of children already in foster care by incentivizing states to reduce placement of children in group care.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS

Crystal Ward Allen
Crystal Ward Allen, MSW, LSW, Senior Director and Strategic Consulting with Casey Family Programs, is a strategic consultant, working with the child welfare communities primarily in Colorado and Ohio to strengthen families and reduce the need for foster care. She has been with Casey Family Programs since spring of 2014, after 24 years working with the child welfare system in Ohio, as well as early years as a juvenile probation counselor in Appalachia, VA; adolescent group care in Pittsburgh, PA; and child welfare in suburban Minnesota. She is a Va. Tech Hokie as well as an OSU Buckeye, loves to ride her bike, hike and enjoy music – but most importantly she has two amazing adult children. Crystal is passionate about ensuring every child and youth has someone that is unconditionally crazy about them – thus, strengthening families is a must

Carla K. Carpenter
As Deputy Director of the Office of Families and Children (OFC) at the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Ms. Carpenter serves as the State Child Welfare Director for Ohio. OFC is responsible for oversight of child abuse prevention, protective services, foster care, and adoption services as well as adult protection services across the state. Since joining the Department in 2010 as Statewide Differential Response Manager and then serving as Bureau Chief of Systems and Practice Advancement, Ms. Carpenter has focused on working in collaboration with system partners to implement innovative programming and improve outcomes. Prior to coming to the Department, Ms. Carpenter served as Associate Director of the National Center for Adoption Law & Policy (now the Family &Youth Law Center) at Capital University Law School. She also brings broad experience working in a variety of direct services settings with families and children. She has a bachelor’s degree in social work from Capital University in Columbus and a master’s degree in social work from Columbia University in New York.

Angela Sausser
Angela Sausser is Executive Director at the Public Children Services Association of Ohio. Angela was the chief of the Bureau of Children and Families for the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, overseeing funding, programs, and initiatives related to the mental health and addiction needs of children and their families. Angela served as the project director for the department’s four-year federal grant called ENGAGE (Engaging the New Generation to Achieve their Goals through Empowerment) focused on expanding systems of care for youth and young adults. Finally, Angela retained her governor-appointed position as the director of Ohio Family and Children First Cabinet Council, a post she held throughout her state government career of nine years. There, Angela worked in partnership with the health and human services Cabinet agencies, the Governor and First Lady’s offices, and the Office of Health Transformation to improve the coordination of services for children and their families. Angela was responsible for convening planning, policy, and fiscal teams to address cross-system issues; providing guidance and technical assistance to the 88 county Family and Chil­dren First Councils (FCFCs); and communicating with state officials, agencies, and community partners about issues, policies and funding impacting children and families.

Additional Resources

Family First Prevention Services Act (P.L. 115-123)
https://comm.ncsl.org/productfiles/112498833/PPT_Christine_Calpin.pdf

FamilyFirstAct.org https://www.familyfirstact.org/

Family First Advocacy Toolkit | American Academy of Pediatrics
https://www.familyfirstact.org/source/american-academy-pediatrics

National Conference of State Legislatures
http://www.ncsl.org/research/human-services/family-first-prevention-services-act-ffpsa.aspx

Information Memorandum on Family First (IM-18-02)​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/im1802

Program Instruction – Implementation of Title IV-E Plan Requirement​
https://www.cwla.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/ACYF-CB-PI-18-09-State-FFPSA-Prevention-PI.pdf

Child Welfare Community Letter – October 1, 2018​
https://www.wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Child-Welfare-Community-FFPSA.pdf

Program Instruction – State Title IV-E Prevention and Family Services and Programs​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/pi1809

Program Instruction – Tribal Title IV-E Agency Requirements for Electing Title IV-E Prevention and Family Services and Programs​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/pi1810

State Child Welfare Director Letter – January 2, 2019​
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/letter-title-iv-e-prevention-clearinghouse

FamilyFirstAct.org
https://www.familyfirstact.org/

Family First Advocacy Toolkit | American Academy of Pediatrics
https://www.familyfirstact.org/source/american-academy-pediatrics

ODJFS FFPSA information
http://jfs.ohio.gov/ocf/Family-First.stm

FFPSA Clearinghouse
https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/

Family First Resources
https://www.familyfirstact.org/

Family First Supporting Evidence Opportunity
https://www.familyfirstact.org/resources/supporting-evidence-building-child-welfare-project

Ohio Title IV-E Waiver (ProtectOHIO)
http://jfs.ohio.gov/ocf/pohio.stm

PCSAO Continuum of Care Reform
https://www.pcsao.org/public-policy/continuum-reform

Ohio START
https://www.pcsao.org/programs/ohio-start

Family First Prevention Services Act. Statutory language, 2018 H.R. 1892. See pp. 169 to 206.
https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1892/BILLS115hr1892enr.pdf

U.S. House of Representatives, Ways & Means Committee Report. Provides background regarding Congressional intent. https://www.congress.gov/114/crpt/hrpt628/CRPT-114hrpt628.pdf

Federal HHS Program Instruction. ACYF-CB-PI-18-07, Issued July 9, 2018, with related attachments.
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/pi1807

Federal Register. Notice for Proposed Model Family Foster Home Licensing Standards, including a summary of the proposed model standards.
https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/08/01/2018-16380/noticefor-proposed-model-family-foster-home-licensing-standards


CIP Training Brief | An Introduction to Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment (ICT) Part 1

By Mike Fox, LPCC-S CCDCIII | Consultant and Trainer/Research Associate

Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment (ICT) Model Overview The Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment (ICT) model, an evidence informed practice, uses an intentionally-integrated and domain-guided treatment approach, which aligns with the Intensive Home Based Treatment (IHBT) design. The reciprocal interactions of co-occurring substance use and serious emotional disabilities are addressed directly, with each considered ‘primary’.

System of Care (SOC) core values, [EDITORIAL NOTE: OR?] Guiding principles include:

– A developmentally mindful and resiliency-oriented approach, strong family partnering, intentionally integrated screening and assessment, integrated and stage-matched treatment design, and ongoing safety and risk assessment.
– Youth, family and community engagement is emphasized and evaluated at all phases.
– ICT therapists receive weekly coaching and consultation in order to stay on top of the multi-faceted challenges and evolving areas of focus.

Youth with co-occurring mental health and substance use issues and their families are harder to engage in treatment, and much harder to retain in treatment.

The youth served by ICT are at risk of out-of-home placement (residential treatment, juvenile detention, child-protective removal etc.), and often experience and display significant risks (to themselves and/or others). Frequently, they and their families have engaged in multiple previous treatment attempts and have experienced great frustration with, and even rejection by, traditional treatment programs.

Download PDF of ICT Presentation

With an intensive home/community-based approach, ICT strives to increase possibilities for engagement with youth and families, thereby increasing chances for treatment retention, overall risks reduction and meaningful change. The types of services provided are also flexible, and very importantly, provided by a single therapist.

The goals of ICT are to reduce risks for the youth and family, retain the youth in the home, stop the loss of personal and family resources, and start to aid in building inner capacities and resiliencies.


An Introduction to Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment (ICT)


Combining experiences from mental health and substance abuse direct treatment, systemic and contextual coordination, and teaching with research-driven data, Mike works with demonstrated practices to assist professionals and communities decrease risk to individuals and help families.

He provides educational training and consultation to professionals working with youth and families with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse issues, including the Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment Model (ICT) model developed by the Center for Innovative Practices.

Previously, Mike worked in the addictions field of counseling with adults and later provided treatment to co-occurring youth in home-based settings. Mike also teaches college courses in psychology, addictions and human development.



 

 


 

 

 

 


Webinar Resources | Training Preview for Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT)

Presented by Sarah Buffie, CEO, Soul Bird Consulting

The Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) is a trauma informed assessment that helps to put a person’s current situation in context with their life experiences.  It is a way to help see the whole person, not just the case files.  This 37 minute webinar and subsequent follow-up introduce you to the TIBT concepts and provide a brief preview of what to expect during Sarah’s full-day training.

NEW RESOURCE: Sarah Buffie’s Learning From Someone’s Biography – Context Matters!

Two New Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) Resource Lists
Books on TIBT | Links and Additional TIBT Resources | View TIBT FAQs Powerpoint Presentation


Sarah Buffie’s Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) training preview webinars. | Click on image to view video of session.

TIBT Training Preview Webinar-Click pic.

Hand-Brain Webinar Takeaway-Click pic.

TIBT Follow-Up FAQs – Click pic.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sarah Buffie’s webinars and trainings were a part of the CIP’s Healthy Kids Learning Community initiative, a dissemination endeavor designed to create an accessible, continuing resource for clinicians and caregivers dealing with the surmounting crises and dimensions that has occurred during the Ohio opiate epidemic over the past half decade.

In keeping with this mission, the Center for Innovative Practices, in collaboration with WraparoundOhio.org and the Healthy Kids Learning Community initiative, partnered with some of Ohio’s foremost experts in their respective fields to lend their perspectives via their areas of expertise in a community share for the Buckeye State’s youth, families, clinicians, and various stakeholders dealing with the challenges and recovery of those youth and families.

View Webinar Series from the Healthy Kids Learning Community Initiative


RELATED RESOURCES | Competencies & Resources for TIBT facilitators – Nadine Burke’s TED Talk and three videos on Attachment Theory from John Bowlby.  – Click on image to view videos.

Nadine Burke Harris-Click pic

John Bowlby-Click pic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Adverse Childhood Experiences – Click on image to visit websites..

ACE’s Center for Disease Control-Click pic

Vincent Felitti ACE’s Childhood Trauma-Click pic

ACE’s Too High News site-Click pic

 

 

 

 

 

 


Social Emotional Development – Click on image to view PDF.

Understanding the Effects of Maltreatment of Brain Development-Click pic for PDF

NYSD Special Education-Click pic for site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PACEs Connection and Red Flags National Framework and Tool Kit – Click on image to visit website.

PACEs Connection-Click pic

Relationship Red Flags-Click pic

Red Flags National Framework and Tool Kit-Click pic

 

 

 

 

 


About Sarah Buffie
Sarah Buffie MSW, LSW, founding director of Soul Bird Consulting believes that nothing has the power to heal like supportive relationships.  Specializing in trauma responsive care, she helps organizations and individuals disrupt current models of thinking by building empathy and understanding around the effects of trauma. Sarah has worked in community organizing- specifically, Asset Based Community Development, for over a decade and has a deep passion for her work.  Her focus is to spread awareness about how trauma affects the brain and body, and teach effective approaches for developing resilience within the people organizations strive to serve, and the people closest to the work, caregivers and direct providers.  Sarah received her Masters in Social Work from Northern Kentucky University with a focus in trauma, positive psychology, and mindfulness. With years working closely in her Cincinnati community through her Americorps service as well as abroad with her Peace Corps service in Namibia, Africa, Sarah brings a unique community building lens to the work.

Sarah received her Masters in Social Work from Northern Kentucky University with a focus in trauma, positive psychology, and mindfulness. With years working closely in her Cincinnati community through her Americorps service as well as abroad with her Peace Corps service in Namibia, Africa, Sarah brings a unique community building lens to the work.

Healing traditionally implies fixing something that is broken, but our philosophy explores healing as an ongoing process of growth and support. Our brains and bodies have an innate capacity to heal themselves and that is amplified when we are in safe relationships with others.

– Hands on approaches to educate, empower and energize.
– Honor and value the work of direct care providers for clients and communities.
– Conduct asset mapping and trauma mapping for clients.
– Working Towards Equity: Consensus Building Workshops
– Affinity group facilitation
– Understanding Personal Bias Training
– Support leadership in developing organizational practices that improve staff retention and decrease burnout.
– Make knowledge accessible and get to the heart of ‘what’s next’ for clients.
– Share easily adaptable self-care practices.
– Breaking Down Organizational Bias
– Identifying Blind Spots for Consumer/Client Relationships
– Leadership Training- Building Authentic Inclusive Workspaces

Let’s work together to challenge the notion of ‘impossible’. Nothing has the power to heal like supportive relationships. We help organizations and individuals disrupt current models of thinking by building empathy and understanding around the effects of trauma and systems of oppression.

Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline View Webinar | FAQs Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline Follow-Up View Webinar | Hand Brain Takeaway with Sarah Buffie View Webinar


MSY Trauma Trainings

Presented by Sarah Buffie, CEO, Soul Bird Consulting

The Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) is a trauma informed assessment that helps to put a person’s current situation in context with their life experiences.  It is a way to help see the whole person, not just the case files.  This 37 minute webinar and subsequent follow-up introduce you to the TIBT concepts and provide a brief preview of what to expect during Sarah’s full-day training.

NEW RESOURCE: Sarah Buffie’s Learning From Someone’s Biography – Context Matters!

Two New Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) Resource Lists
Books on TIBT | Links and Additional TIBT Resources | View TIBT FAQs Powerpoint Presentation


Sarah Buffie’s Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) training preview webinars. | Click on image to view video of session.

TIBT Training Preview Webinar-Click pic.

Hand-Brain Webinar Takeaway-Click pic.

TIBT Follow-Up FAQs – Click pic.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sarah Buffie’s webinars and trainings were a part of the CIP’s Healthy Kids Learning Community initiative, a dissemination endeavor designed to create an accessible, continuing resource for clinicians and caregivers dealing with the surmounting crises and dimensions that has occurred during the Ohio opiate epidemic over the past half decade.

In keeping with this mission, the Center for Innovative Practices, in collaboration with WraparoundOhio.org and the Healthy Kids Learning Community initiative, partnered with some of Ohio’s foremost experts in their respective fields to lend their perspectives via their areas of expertise in a community share for the Buckeye State’s youth, families, clinicians, and various stakeholders dealing with the challenges and recovery of those youth and families.

View Webinar Series from the Healthy Kids Learning Community Initiative


RELATED RESOURCES | Competencies & Resources for TIBT facilitators – Nadine Burke’s TED Talk and three videos on Attachment Theory from John Bowlby.  – Click on image to view videos.

Nadine Burke Harris-Click pic

John Bowlby-Click pic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Adverse Childhood Experiences – Click on image to visit websites..

ACE’s Center for Disease Control-Click pic

Vincent Felitti ACE’s Childhood Trauma-Click pic

ACE’s Too High News site-Click pic

 

 

 

 

 

 


Social Emotional Development – Click on image to view PDF.

Understanding the Effects of Maltreatment of Brain Development-Click pic for PDF

NYSD Special Education-Click pic for site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PACEs Connection and Red Flags National Framework and Tool Kit – Click on image to visit website.

PACEs Connection-Click pic

Relationship Red Flags-Click pic

Red Flags National Framework and Tool Kit-Click pic

 

 

 

 

 


About Sarah Buffie
Sarah Buffie MSW, LSW, founding director of Soul Bird Consulting believes that nothing has the power to heal like supportive relationships.  Specializing in trauma responsive care, she helps organizations and individuals disrupt current models of thinking by building empathy and understanding around the effects of trauma. Sarah has worked in community organizing- specifically, Asset Based Community Development, for over a decade and has a deep passion for her work.  Her focus is to spread awareness about how trauma affects the brain and body, and teach effective approaches for developing resilience within the people organizations strive to serve, and the people closest to the work, caregivers and direct providers.  Sarah received her Masters in Social Work from Northern Kentucky University with a focus in trauma, positive psychology, and mindfulness. With years working closely in her Cincinnati community through her Americorps service as well as abroad with her Peace Corps service in Namibia, Africa, Sarah brings a unique community building lens to the work.

Sarah received her Masters in Social Work from Northern Kentucky University with a focus in trauma, positive psychology, and mindfulness. With years working closely in her Cincinnati community through her Americorps service as well as abroad with her Peace Corps service in Namibia, Africa, Sarah brings a unique community building lens to the work.

Healing traditionally implies fixing something that is broken, but our philosophy explores healing as an ongoing process of growth and support. Our brains and bodies have an innate capacity to heal themselves and that is amplified when we are in safe relationships with others.

– Hands on approaches to educate, empower and energize.
– Honor and value the work of direct care providers for clients and communities.
– Conduct asset mapping and trauma mapping for clients.
– Working Towards Equity: Consensus Building Workshops
– Affinity group facilitation
– Understanding Personal Bias Training
– Support leadership in developing organizational practices that improve staff retention and decrease burnout.
– Make knowledge accessible and get to the heart of ‘what’s next’ for clients.
– Share easily adaptable self-care practices.
– Breaking Down Organizational Bias
– Identifying Blind Spots for Consumer/Client Relationships
– Leadership Training- Building Authentic Inclusive Workspaces

Let’s work together to challenge the notion of ‘impossible’. Nothing has the power to heal like supportive relationships. We help organizations and individuals disrupt current models of thinking by building empathy and understanding around the effects of trauma and systems of oppression.

Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline View Webinar | FAQs Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline Follow-Up View Webinar | Hand Brain Takeaway with Sarah Buffie View Webinar



WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

 



WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

Sarah Buffie Resource Links for TIBT Training Preview | Trauma, Impact, Resilience & Development

Bessel van der Kolk, The Body Keeps the Score Click here


Louis Cozolino, The neuroscience of human relationships: Attachment and the developing social brain


Dan Siegel, The Developing Mind: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are


Steven Porges, The Polyvagal Theory


Understanding Resilience with Buffie & Vicario:o



WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

 

 

 


The CIP’s Wraparound Infrastructure Development Series | Sessions 1-3

Sessions respectively recorded: April 6, 2021, May 5, 2021, June 9, 2021

Working Together to Assure the Infrastructure for Successful Wraparound Implementation

The CIP Ohio Wraparound Training and Workforce Development | Wraparound Resource Tool Kit

This initial session of the series,​ ” Working Together to Assure the Infrastructure for Successful Wraparound Implementation​,” provides an overview with strategies for implementing Wraparound in a System of Care​. It offers tool sets for developing highly customized plans of care, team- based processes employing strengths and unmet needs as the basis for different help and supports for families with complex needs​, and seeks to “magnify” help beyond the boundaries of services.

In addition, the session offers insights regarding organizing processes best applied to the “outliers” from across systems​;  offers mechanisms for reflecting on and improving the local system of care​; ideas for building and maintaining a focus on what individual family stories teach us about our community systems​; leadership “learning from” family plans alternatives to “fixing” plans​; and individualized answers to improved pathways for families​.

Finally, it addresses questions regarding the given the status of Wraparound in our communities such as: What do we do about assuring that the right people are engaged together to take best advantage of these opportunities?​ What do we do about assuring that the right people have the right information to prepare for these opportunities?​ What do we need to do about building spots at the table for all stakeholders?​ What do we do now to ensure that Wraparound remains a community owned resource in the future?​ What are we planning to assure that we do more than build Wraparound, also change our organizations so they align better with our values?​ What are our first thoughts about managing multiple opportunities in a similar time window (crossing the streams)? And what is our plan to move to shared action in time for these opportunities?​

(You may need to start at the beginning.)


Keeping the Values In as you Build Wraparound Out

The second session of the Wraparound Infrastructure Development series,​ entitled, ”Keeping the Values In as You Build Wraparound Out,” offers guidelines on staffing and human resource capacities, access to needed services and supports, and accountability. In addition, it examines various pathways to customization along with the process of understanding and communicating what we are doing and whether it is making a difference.

Overall, the session helps clinicians and organizations maintain the values of Wraparound as you build out through intentional self-reflection, analysis, and response. It also assists in developing a keystone pattern of reflecting on the ways in which the system of care principles are articulated and visible in your work and decisions.

If you missed it, View Session 1 here


The First Decisions are Never the Last: What Comes Next?

Session 3, the final session of the of the Wraparound Infrastructure Development series, “The First Decisions are Never the Last: What Comes Next?” addresses key areas for moving forward, incluuding: How to plan an organized community response to these initiatives; how to educate and mobilize the community to work together to support the work and expand our system of care; Identifying local provider capacity to provide services; what new resources does Ohio RISE offer, i.e. Mobile Response Services, Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities and IHBT services; and what do these mean for individual counties.

Our aims and efforts include a broader vision for our community SOC that can serve as a foundation for these decisions and opportunities. We have built a home for the “crossing the streams” conversation somewhere in our SOC intersystem structures while thinking through how to get the right information to the right people as soon as it is available. Moreover, we have ways to update staff and customers about the latest decisions and resources in our SOC and are building a capacity to revise structures and decisions as new features and events indicate.

The streams suggest possibilities that can be invaluable to the families we get to serve, as long as we work to be strategic and intentional rather than simply reactive. Aligning efforts across these streams can make a cross-system system more effective, keeping the values in as you build out.

New processes, including regionality, need to inform our next decisions involving sources and locations of services, making a difference through which Wraparound can be the “grease” that makes the pieces run more smoothly together.



WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Click on pic to download PDF)

:

 

 

 

 


Wraparound Infrastructure Development Series | Session 1 (April 6, 2021)

Working Together to Assure the Infrastructure for Successful Wraparound Implementation

This initial session of the series,​ ” Working Together to Assure the Infrastructure for Successful Wraparound Implementation​,” provides an overview with strategies for implementing Wraparound in a System of Care​. It offers tool sets for developing highly customized plans of care, team- based processes employing strengths and unmet needs as the basis for different help and supports for families with complex needs​, and seeks to “magnify” help beyond the boundaries of services.

In addition, the session offers insights regarding organizing processes best applied to the “outliers” from across systems​;  offers mechanisms for reflecting on and improving the local system of care​; ideas for building and maintaining a focus on what individual family stories teach us about our community systems​; leadership “learning from” family plans alternatives to “fixing” plans​; and individualized answers to improved pathways for families​.

Finally, it addresses questions regarding the given the status of Wraparound in our communities such as: What do we do about assuring that the right people are engaged together to take best advantage of these opportunities?​ What do we do about assuring that the right people have the right information to prepare for these opportunities?​ What do we need to do about building spots at the table for all stakeholders?​ What do we do now to ensure that Wraparound remains a community owned resource in the future?​ What are we planning to assure that we do more than build Wraparound, also change our organizations so they align better with our values?​ What are our first thoughts about managing multiple opportunities in a similar time window (crossing the streams)? And what is our plan to move to shared action in time for these opportunities?​

(You may need to start at the beginning.)

 

 

 


Wraparound Infrastructure Development Series | Session 2 (May 5, 2021)

Keeping the Values In as you Build Wraparound Out

The second session of the Wraparound Infrastructure Development series,​ entitled, ”Keeping the Values In as You Build Wraparound Out,” offers guidelines on staffing and human resource capacities, access to needed services and supports, and accountability. In addition, it examines various pathways to customization along with the process of understanding and communicating what we are doing and whether it is making a difference.

Overall, the session helps clinicians and organizations maintain the values of Wraparound as you build out through intentional self-reflection, analysis, and response. It also assists in developing a keystone pattern of reflecting on the ways in which the system of care principles are articulated and visible in your work and decisions.

If you missed it, View Session 1 here

 


 


Wraparound Infrastructure Development Series | Session 3 (June 9, 2021)

The First Decisions are Never the Last: What Comes Next?

Session 3, the final session of the of the Wraparound Infrastructure Development series, “The First Decisions are Never the Last: What Comes Next?” addresses key areas for moving forward, incluuding: How to plan an organized community response to these initiatives; how to educate and mobilize the community to work together to support the work and expand our system of care; Identifying local provider capacity to provide services; what new resources does Ohio RISE offer, i.e. Mobile Response Services, Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities and IHBT services; and what do these mean for individual counties.

Our aims and efforts include a broader vision for our community SOC that can serve as a foundation for these decisions and opportunities. We have built a home for the “crossing the streams” conversation somewhere in our SOC intersystem structures while thinking through how to get the right information to the right people as soon as it is available. Moreover, we have ways to update staff and customers about the latest decisions and resources in our SOC and are building a capacity to revise structures and decisions as new features and events indicate.

The streams suggest possibilities that can be invaluable to the families we get to serve, as long as we work to be strategic and intentional rather than simply reactive. Aligning efforts across these streams can make a cross-system system more effective, keeping the values in as you build out.

New processes, including regionality, need to inform our next decisions involving sources and locations of services, making a difference through which Wraparound can be the “grease” that makes the pieces run more smoothly together.


PROVIDER SELF-CARE

MSY Self-Care Trainings

Urban Zen: Avoiding Burnout in High Stress Work Environments
Presented by Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500
Marcia Miller has been teaching yoga for over 40 years and has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) Trainings and in charge of Reiki training for UZIT. She is on a community advisory board for the Center for Integrative Health and Wellness at the Ohio State University and offers UZIT modalities in Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University.

Webinar | Urban Zen Avoiding Burnout in High Stress Work Environments
https://wraparoundohio.org/webinar-urban-zen-avoiding-burnout-in-high-stress-work-environments/


Shifting Gears & Changing Minds | Adapting Mental Health & Behavioral Health Services for COVID-19
The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP) offers a timely webinar on how mental health and behavioral health specialists and clinicians can meet the evolving needs of young clients and their families during the Covid-19 crisis and the necessary distancing involved. The session explores strategies, tools, and lessons learned in ways to offer connection and continuity those in recovery. – Hosted by the CIP’s Senior Research Associate, Bobbi Beale, PsyD as part of the CIP’s continuing mission to help clinicians, their organizations, their clients, families and  communities adjust to new ways of connecting in recovery, especially with high fidelity intensive home-base treatment and Wraparound Systems of Care approaches to youth mental health and substance use recovery.

View Video of Session here


WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

Healthy Kids Learning Community Facilitated Discussions On the Opioid Crisis in Ohio

 


Webinar | Urban Zen Avoiding Burnout in High Stress Work Environments

Presented by Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), WraparoundOhio and the Healthy Kids Learning Community teamed up with Marcia Miller (pictured below right) presenting a series of trainings involving Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT), Marcia provided UZIT overviews as well as basic strategies for alleviating stress, particularly stress brought on by trauma. Her webinar and trainings also focused as much on caregivers and clinicians as patients, notably at a time when the levels of burnout and turnover in the youth recovery field are experiencing a significant rise, especially among new highers unaccustomed to the overwhelming youth and families needs brought on by the opiate crisis.

View Marcia Miller’s Urban Zen Integrative Therapy Webinar | Learn More about Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT)

A certified yoga therapist, has been teaching yoga for over 40 years, Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500, has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the UZIT Trainings and directs the year-long trainings in Columbus.

About Marcia Miller
Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500, and certified yoga therapist, has been teaching yoga for over 40 years and has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the UZIT Trainings and directs the year-long trainings in Columbus.  She is also the Reiki Master and a curriculum advisor for UZIT National. She is on a community advisory board for the Center for Integrative Health and Wellness at the Ohio State University and offers UZIT modalities in Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University and to staff members at Kobacker House Hospice.

Marcia leads several types of yoga teacher trainings and she designed and taught the yoga protocol for two large Ohio State University research projects. One researched the effect of yoga on the immune system and the other on the benefits of yoga for women recovering from breast cancer.

Marcia is also a Reiki Master Teacher and teaches Reiki around the country as well as at Yoga on High. She uses reiki extensively in her classes and with private clients. She is also passionate about Nonviolent Communication (NVC) and is bringing NVC to the yoga community and yoga to the NVC community. In 2008 Marcia took the lead in founding the Yoga on High Foundation, a fund at the Columbus Foundation as a way to serve all populations of people in her community including low income kids, homeless veterans and populations traumatized by sexual violence.

Marcia recently had the privilege and joy to teach UZIT to hospice workers in S. Africa and continues to offer skill building in self-care to people in hard jobs who want to continue their lives of service. Her yoga training has been continuous as she has broadened her knowledge in areas of asana and meditation, anatomy and physiology, yoga for traumatized populations and therapeutic yoga.

RELATED RESOURCE
The Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute is the largest Yoga Teacher Training and Reiki training center in the Midwest offering comprehensive programs in the numerous areas: | Learn More |


 

Experience TIC: Covid 19 and Provider Resilience | Secondary Traumatic Stress Training

First of a Four-Part Series

Bobbi Beale, PsyD, Co-Director of the Center for Innovative Practices (CIP) at Case Western Reserve University, presents the first installment in a four-part series designed to help care providers care for themselves. The need for provider self-care, always a concern in the healthcare field, has been especially pronounced during Covid-19 and the myriad challenges it has brought.

Joining Dr. Beale is frequent CIP training associate, Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500, a certified yoga therapist who has been teaching yoga for over 40 years and has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the UZIT Trainings and directs the year-long trainings in Columbus.

Dr. Beale has specialized in designing non-traditional therapy programs for youth populations that are at risk or have trauma histories. Her programs have utilized adventure therapy (AT) to increase skills and resiliency, and include individual, family and group applications. She also worked on validating AT with clinical research in Trauma-Informed Day Treatment and implementing a new AT program with both home-based and multi-family group components. Bobbi is also a trainer and consultant on issues related to youth including: Trauma & Resiliency, Bullying, Supportive Behavior Management, Outcomes, Cultural Diversity, Evidence-Based Practices and Teambuilding.


About Marcia Miller
Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500, and certified yoga therapist, has been teaching yoga for over 40 years and has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the UZIT Trainings and directs the year-long trainings in Columbus.  She is also the Reiki Master and a curriculum advisor for UZIT National. She is on a community advisory board for the Center for Integrative Health and Wellness at the Ohio State University and offers UZIT modalities in Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University and to staff members at Kobacker House Hospice.

Marcia leads several types of yoga teacher trainings and she designed and taught the yoga protocol for two large Ohio State University research projects. One researched the effect of yoga on the immune system and the other on the benefits of yoga for women recovering from breast cancer.

Marcia is also a Reiki Master Teacher and teaches Reiki around the country as well as at Yoga on High. She uses reiki extensively in her classes and with private clients. She is also passionate about Nonviolent Communication (NVC) and is bringing NVC to the yoga community and yoga to the NVC community. In 2008 Marcia took the lead in founding the Yoga on High Foundation, a fund at the Columbus Foundation as a way to serve all populations of people in her community including low income kids, homeless veterans and populations traumatized by sexual violence.

Marcia recently had the privilege and joy to teach UZIT to hospice workers in S. Africa and continues to offer skill building in self-care to people in hard jobs who want to continue their lives of service. Her yoga training has been continuous as she has broadened her knowledge in areas of asana and meditation, anatomy and physiology, yoga for traumatized populations and therapeutic yoga.

RELATED RESOURCE
The Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute is the largest Yoga Teacher Training and Reiki training center in the Midwest offering comprehensive programs in the numerous areas: | Learn More |



WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

A Self-Care Training Video for Caregivers and Providers | Experience TIC: Covid-19 and Provider Resilience

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP) offers a timely webinar on how mental health and behavioral health specialists and clinicians can meet the evolving needs of young clients and their families during the Covid-19 crisis and the necessary distancing involved. The session explores strategies, tools, and lessons learned in ways to offer connection and continuity those in recovery.

This self-care training for clinicians and care providers, presented by the Center of Innovative Practices’ Bobbu Beale, PSY.D. and Marcia Miller, founder of Columbus, Ohio’s Yoga on High, provides an overview of trauma and Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) from Dr. Beale alongside physical exercises, activities, and movement practices provides by Marcia Miller that can help alleviate the secondary trauma and stress many caregivers may experience when treating at-risk youth and their families, especially during Covid-19.

 

 

 

 

 

Self-Care Training Video for Caregivers and Providers | Secondary Traumatic Stress & Provider Resiliency

Training is accompanied by five PDF handouts available at WraparoundOhio.org:

https://wraparoundohio.org/a-self-care-training-video-for-caregivers-and-providers-secondary-traumatic-stress-provider-resiliency/

The handouts include:

Professional Quality Of Life Scale (PROQOL) Compassion Satisfaction And Compassion Fatigue (PROQOL) Version 5 (2009)

Personal Resilience Plan

Helpers’ Pocket Card – Caring For Yourself In The Face Of Difficult Work

Experience Tic: Covid-19 & Provider Resilience

4-7-8 Breath Relaxation Exercise – A Patient Handout from Dr Andrew Weil

Video edited for continuity – Press pause for appropriate breaks at your comfort pace

 


About the Presenters

Bobbi Beale, PSY.D. is a Senior Consultant & Trainer, Center for Innovative Practices, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. Dr. Beale has specialized in designing non-traditional therapy programs for youth populations that are at risk or have trauma histories. Her programs have utilized adventure therapy (AT) to increase skills and resiliency, and include individual, family and group applications. She also worked on validating AT with clinical research in Trauma-Informed Day Treatment and implementing a new AT program with both home-based and multi-family group components. Bobbi is also a trainer and consultant on issues related to youth including: Trauma & Resiliency, Bullying, Supportive Behavior Management, Outcomes, Cultural Diversity, Evidence-Based Practices and Teambuilding. Dr. Beale previously served as the Director of the Center for Applied Resilience at Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health in Canton, Ohio. She has been serving at-risk youth and families at C&A since 1991; first as a home-based therapist, then a program supervisor, program designer and division director.

Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500, and certified yoga therapist, has been teaching yoga for over 40 years and has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the UZIT Trainings and directs the year-long trainings in Columbus.  She is also the Reiki Master and a curriculum advisor for UZIT National. She is on a community advisory board for the Center for Integrative Health and Wellness at the Ohio State University and offers UZIT modalities in Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University and to staff members at Kobacker House Hospice.

Marcia leads several types of yoga teacher trainings and she designed and taught the yoga protocol for two large Ohio State University research projects. One researched the effect of yoga on the immune system and the other on the benefits of yoga for women recovering from breast cancer.

Marcia is also a Reiki Master Teacher and teaches Reiki around the country as well as at Yoga on High. She uses reiki extensively in her classes and with private clients. She is also passionate about Nonviolent Communication (NVC) and is bringing NVC to the yoga community and yoga to the NVC community. In 2008 Marcia took the lead in founding the Yoga on High Foundation, a fund at the Columbus Foundation as a way to serve all populations of people in her community including low income kids, homeless veterans and populations traumatized by sexual violence.

Marcia recently had the privilege and joy to teach UZIT to hospice workers in S. Africa and continues to offer skill building in self-care to people in hard jobs who want to continue their lives of service. Her yoga training has been continuous as she has broadened her knowledge in areas of asana and meditation, anatomy and physiology, yoga for traumatized populations and therapeutic yoga.

RELATED RESOURCE
The Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute is the largest Yoga Teacher Training and Reiki training center in the Midwest offering comprehensive programs in the numerous areas: | Learn More |


 

 

Hosted by the CIP’s Senior Research Associate, Bobbi Beale, PsyD as part of the CIP’s continuing mission to help clinicians, their organizations, their clients, families and  communities adjust to new ways of connecting in recovery, especially with high fidelity intensive home-base treatment and Wraparound Systems of Care approaches to youth mental health and substance use recovery. View Session in Bigger Frame | View Video of Session

Shifting Gears & Changing Our Minds – Adjusting BH services during COVID-19 HO2 (PDF)  Here | Shifting Gears & Changing Our Minds – Adjusting BH services during COVID-19 HO2 (Word Document) Here | Individualized Resilience Plan – Sample (PDF) Here | Individualized Resilience Plan – Sample (Word Document)  Here

 


 

Healthy Kids Learning Community Facilitated Discussions On the Opioid Crisis in Ohio

 


Healthy Kids Learning Community Facilitated Discussions On the Opioid Crisis in Ohio

 

 

 

 

 


THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC | HEALTHY KIDS LEARNING COMMUNITY

Webinar | Understanding Opioid Addiction and Recovery

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) measuring overdose deaths from 2000 to 2014, the United States is experiencing an epidemic of drug overdose (poisoning) deaths. Since 2000, the rate of deaths from drug overdoses has increased 137%, including a 200% increase in the rate of overdose deaths involving opioids (opioid pain relievers and heroin).

In Ohio in 2016, there were 4,329 overall overdose deaths, representing an over 30% increase from the previous year. 2,296 deaths involved synthetic opiates (primarily fentanyl and excluding methadone) while 1,478 deaths involved heroin and 867 deaths involved Rx opioids. One bright spot is that deaths involving physician-prescribed opioids declined for the 5th straight year. This decline was matched by a four-year decline in opioids prescribed in Ohio over the last four years and a significant increase in prescription monitoring: Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS).

View Webinar Understanding Opioid Addiction and Pathways to Recovery | View Powerpoint Presentation PDF

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Ohio Family and Children First, and with the support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), presents a webinar on “Understanding Opioid Addiction and Pathways to Recovery,” providing an overview opiates, opioids, addiction, and some promising practices toward recovery and reduction of use. The webinar was presented by Michael Fox, LPCC-S, LCDC III, Consultant and Trainer: Center for Innovative Practices.

ALSO: View and learn more from our complementary webinar The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families

Perhaps Some Hope
One highlight from the webinar involves Monitoring the Future, a yearly, NIDA-funded survey conducted with thousands of 8th, 10th and 12th graders from around the country. It notes quite low levels – especially by comparison to 10-year peak levels of opioid use. MTF and NIDA Director, Nora Volkow, have observed that the current lower rates of opioid use by youth may be hopefully predictive as ‘they may well take their more cautious behaviors with them into their twenties and thirties. The current highest-risk group – young adults – demonstrated much higher rates of opioid use a decade ago while they were teens.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Click on pic to download PDF)

   

Also:
The National Child Traumatic Network Visit site | The Child Trauma Academy Visit site | ACE Study Visit site  | Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Visit site | American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Visit site | The Sanctuary Model Visit site
The Public Children Services Association of Ohio Visit site


About the Presenter
Michael Fox,
LPCC-S, LCDC III, Consultant and Trainer, Center for Innovative Practice
Combining experiences from mental health and substance abuse direct treatment, systemic and contextual coordination, and teaching with research-driven data, Mike works with demonstrated practices to assist professionals and communities decrease risk to individuals and help families. He provides educational training and consultation to professionals working with youth and families with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse issues, including the Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment Model (ICT) model developed by the Center for Innovative Practices. Previously, Mike worked in the addictions field of counseling with adults and later provided treatment to co-occurring youth in home-based settings. Mike also teaches college courses in psychology, addictions and human development.


Presented by the Center for Innovative Practices (CIP) and WraparoundOhio.org in partnership with: (To learn more, click on pic.)


Webinar | The Opioid Crisis: Impact on Families Part 2

The opiate crisis in Ohio is affecting our children and families at alarming rates. Through it all, there is a need to understand this crisis and prepare beyond the immediate needs and look into long-term lasting affects on the children in families who struggle with opiate addiction. Ohio is the Second worst state in the nation for drug overdoses, with Dayton ranked 1rst with the highest per capita overdoses in the county.

– We rank in the top 6 for most deaths.
– Children in relative placement has increased 62%
– Foster Care placements have increased 11%.While Opiate use has increased the State allotment of Child Welfare funding has decreased by 21%

View Webinar Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families | View Powerpoint Presentation PDF

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Ohio Family and Children First, and with the support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), presents a webinar on “The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families,” exploring the unique impact of parental opiate use on the development of the child and the resulting challenges. We know that more children have been taken into child protective services custody due to opiate addiction in the family, that they are in out of home placement longer, and they seem to have a unique set of challenges.  Join us to learn about how to support our families and children. The webinar was presented by Angela LaRiviere, Director of Youth Move Ohio, and Timothy Schaffner, Executive Director of Trumbull County Children Services.Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings from a Mixed Methods Study Opiate Presentation Resources and References.

ALSO: View and learn more from our complementary webinar Understanding Opioid Addiction and Recovery

Ohio Drug Overdose Data: 2016 General Findings
Ohio’s opioid epidemic continued to evolve in 2016 to stronger drugs, driving an increase in unintentional overdose deaths. The data shows a significant increase in overdose deaths involving the opioid fentanyl, the emergence of more powerful fentanyl-related drugs like carfentanil, and indications that cocaine was used with fentanyl and other opiates.

Read Full Report

The data also shows some promising progress – the fewest unintentional overdose deaths involving prescription opioids since 2009 (excluding deaths involving fentanyl and related drugs)Read Full ReportIllegally produced fentanyl can be hundreds of times stronger than heroin, and carfentanil and other related drugs can be stronger than fentanyl.In 2016, unintentional drug overdoses caused the deaths of 4,050 Ohio residents, a 32.8 percent increase compared to 2015 when there were 3,050 overdose deaths.Fentanyl and related drugs were involved in 58.2 percent (2,357) of all unintentional drug overdose deaths in 2016.

Read More: Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings from a Mixed Methods Study

By comparison, fentanyl was involved in 37.9 percent (1,155) in 2015, 19.9 percent (503) in 2014, 4.0 percent (84) in 2013, and 3.9 percent (75) in 2012 (see Figures 1 and 2). With the emergence of carfentanil in 2016, the fentanyl-related drug was involved in 340 overdose deaths, most of them during the second half of the year. For males and females respectively, the largest number of fentanyl and related drug overdose deaths were among the 25-34 age group. (see Figure 3). The increase in fentanyl and carfentanil overdose deaths in 2016 corresponded with an increase in drug seizure reports by law enforcement (see Figure 4).

The number of cocaine-related overdose deaths rose significantly from 685 in 2015 to 1,109 in 2016 — a 61.9 percent increase (see Table 1). Of cocaine-related overdose deaths in 2016, 80.2 percent also involved an opiate, and 55.8 percent involved fentanyl and related opiates in particular.

The number of overdose deaths involving heroin remained relatively flat with 1,444 overdose deaths in 2016 compared to 1,424 in 2015.

Learn More: Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Click on pic to download PDF)

: 

Also:
The National Child Traumatic Network Visit site | The Child Trauma Academy Visit site | ACE Study Visit site  | Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  Visit site | American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Visit site | The Sanctuary Model Visit site
The Public Children Services Association of Ohio Visit site


About the Presenters
Angela LaRiviere, Director of Youth Move Ohio
Angela LaRiviere supervises staff and youth to develop strategic plans for youth inclusion and voice in Ohio, provides training and guidance to youth, partner organizations and county groups. She also oversees grants and chapter development and participates in state management teams. She develops youth leadership councils on a state and county level. Develop advocacy and strategic plans. Provide support for youth and provide training and technical assistance to state and county partners. She has also created programing and policy agendas to address homeless youth issues and has facilitated state and local youth empowerment councils to address root causes of homelessness while also providing training and technical assistance to local, state, and national partners. she has also developed special programs for homeless youth and mothers and developed community awareness and funding strategies.

Timothy Schaffner, M.Ed., LSWTrustee
Executive Director, Trumbull County Children Services, Timothy Schaffner was named Executive Director of Trumbull County Children Services in November 2012. As a leader in behavioral health and residential care for children, Schaffner has provided consultation and training for many educational, residential and child welfare facilities and brings a wealth of management and child mental health treatment experience to his role as executive director.Schaffner had been the executive director of Valley Counseling Services prior to joining Trumbull County Children Services (in April 2012), from 1995 to 2006 served as Corporate Director/Corporate Clinical Executive for the Center for Behavioral Medicine at Forum Health, and prior to that he was director of youth services at Tod Children’s Hospital in Youngstown. Schaffner brings a total of 37 years of experience in professional child care to his position.


 

Presented by the Center for Innovative Practices and WraparoundOhio.org in partnership with: (To learn more, click on pic.)

 


Webinar | The Opioid Crisis: Impact on Families Part 2

This second part of the two part webinar examines assessments, interventions, and trauma-informed approaches in addressing youth and families caught in the grip of the opiate crisis in Ohio.

View Part 2 of The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families

As was covered in Part 1, Ohio, being at the forefront of the opiate crisis, children and families have been impacted by this epidemic at rates unparalleled in modern times.
Beyond the immediate impact on children’s well-being, the effects may be more long lasting as abrupt changes in parental attunement can impact patterns of attachment. Also notable, routine interventions may be inadequate to address children and family needs

The objectives in Part 2 include:
Completing the overview of Part 1 on the impact on individual children; providing updates on the current opiate crisis impact on youth, families and child welfare in Ohio; and an overview of interventions on multiple levels including system of care, agencies, programs, individuals and communities

Covered in Part 2 are trending narratives in the crisis, which does not necessarily rely on the adjective ‘opiate’ to explain how it is unfolding. For example, unintended opiate related deaths are trending down in most hard hit communities, with heroin being replaced by fentanyl and other synthetics. Furthermore, fewer pharmaceutical opiates are being dispensed and the use of naloxone by first responders is becoming more a part of routine response to overdoses. Finally, the increase in the availability of medically Assisted Treatments like buprenorphine is helping combat addiction and usage.

Nevertheless, not all the news is good as opiate use is being replaced by other substances like crack cocaine and methamphetamines. And while overdose deaths are decreasing, its impact on our citizens and systems continues, with children in custody related to parental substance use continues to increase with those children in custody continuing to be
younger in age, in care longer, and at higher levels of care.

All of this has had an impact on Ohio’s systems of care, particularly PTSD occurring in caregivers overwhelmed by the scope and dimensions of the crisis. (See Marcia Miller’s Urban Zen webinar for ways to help alleviate burnout and stress in caregivers by clicking here.)

Significant takeaways from Part 2 include:

– Addressing secondary trauma in caregivers is crucial to reducing stress, burnout, and ultimately staff turnover, which can impact and impede recovery across the board.

– Attunement and attachment between parents and children consist of an ongoing process learning and growth between parents and children. – Attunement can be enhanced and enriched; attachments can be repaired and strengthened.

– Knowledge by caregivers – especially those new to the field – of trauma-informed approaches and care – Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in particular – is crucial in understanding the landscape of opiate recovery and the proper evidenced-based interventions that prove effective.

– Active listening is premium when establishing safety, stability, and trust with a new individual and her or his family. Curb the strong instinct to find or provide “solutions” to problems and allow the clients/patients to bear witness to their individual experiences and establish the process for them to discover their own solutions. Active listening, time, and patience.

– Assessments and screenings are a key component is outlining intervention options and understanding what facilitates positive outcomes.

– Before we ask, “What’s wrong?” – Ask: “What happened?” in a person’s life. From there, we can develop effective interventions.



 

Through it all, there is a need to understand this crisis and prepare beyond the immediate needs and look into long-term lasting affects on the children in families who struggle with opiate addiction. Ohio is the Second worst state in the nation for drug overdoses, with Dayton ranked 1rst with the highest per capita overdoses in the county.

– We rank in the top 6 for most deaths.
– Children in relative placement has increased 62%
– Foster Care placements have increased 11%.While Opiate use has increased the State allotment of Child Welfare funding has decreased by 21%

View Webinar Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families | View Powerpoint Presentation PDF

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Ohio Family and Children First, and with the support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), presents a webinar on “The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families,” exploring the unique impact of parental opiate use on the development of the child and the resulting challenges. We know that more children have been taken into child protective services custody due to opiate addiction in the family, that they are in out of home placement longer, and they seem to have a unique set of challenges.  Join us to learn about how to support our families and children. The webinar was presented by Angela LaRiviere, Director of Youth Move Ohio, and Timothy Schaffner, Executive Director of Trumbull County Children Services.Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings from a Mixed Methods Study Opiate Presentation Resources and References.

ALSO: View and learn more from our complementary webinar Understanding Opioid Addiction and Recovery

Ohio Drug Overdose Data: 2016 General Findings
Ohio’s opioid epidemic continued to evolve in 2016 to stronger drugs, driving an increase in unintentional overdose deaths. The data shows a significant increase in overdose deaths involving the opioid fentanyl, the emergence of more powerful fentanyl-related drugs like carfentanil, and indications that cocaine was used with fentanyl and other opiates.

Read Full Report

The data also shows some promising progress – the fewest unintentional overdose deaths involving prescription opioids since 2009 (excluding deaths involving fentanyl and related drugs)Read Full ReportIllegally produced fentanyl can be hundreds of times stronger than heroin, and carfentanil and other related drugs can be stronger than fentanyl.In 2016, unintentional drug overdoses caused the deaths of 4,050 Ohio residents, a 32.8 percent increase compared to 2015 when there were 3,050 overdose deaths.Fentanyl and related drugs were involved in 58.2 percent (2,357) of all unintentional drug overdose deaths in 2016.

Read More: Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings from a Mixed Methods Study

By comparison, fentanyl was involved in 37.9 percent (1,155) in 2015, 19.9 percent (503) in 2014, 4.0 percent (84) in 2013, and 3.9 percent (75) in 2012 (see Figures 1 and 2). With the emergence of carfentanil in 2016, the fentanyl-related drug was involved in 340 overdose deaths, most of them during the second half of the year. For males and females respectively, the largest number of fentanyl and related drug overdose deaths were among the 25-34 age group. (see Figure 3). The increase in fentanyl and carfentanil overdose deaths in 2016 corresponded with an increase in drug seizure reports by law enforcement (see Figure 4).

The number of cocaine-related overdose deaths rose significantly from 685 in 2015 to 1,109 in 2016 — a 61.9 percent increase (see Table 1). Of cocaine-related overdose deaths in 2016, 80.2 percent also involved an opiate, and 55.8 percent involved fentanyl and related opiates in particular.

The number of overdose deaths involving heroin remained relatively flat with 1,444 overdose deaths in 2016 compared to 1,424 in 2015.

Learn More: Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health


ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Timothy Schaffner, M.Ed., LSWTrustee
Executive Director, Trumbull County Children Services, Timothy Schaffner was named Executive Director of Trumbull County Children Services in November 2012. As a leader in behavioral health and residential care for children, Schaffner has provided consultation and training for many educational, residential and child welfare facilities and brings a wealth of management and child mental health treatment experience to his role as executive director.Schaffner had been the executive director of Valley Counseling Services prior to joining Trumbull County Children Services (in April 2012), from 1995 to 2006 served as Corporate Director/Corporate Clinical Executive for the Center for Behavioral Medicine at Forum Health, and prior to that he was director of youth services at Tod Children’s Hospital in Youngstown. Schaffner brings a total of 37 years of experience in professional child care to his position.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Click on pic to download PDF)

: 

Also:
The National Child Traumatic Network Visit site | The Child Trauma Academy Visit site | ACE Study Visit site  | Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  Visit site | American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Visit site | The Sanctuary Model Visit site
The Public Children Services Association of Ohio Visit site

Angela Lariviere : Angela.yepdirector@gmail.com
TIM SCHAFFNER email; timothy.schaffner@jfs.ohio.gov


Presented by the Center for Innovative Practices and WraparoundOhio.org in partnership with: (To learn more, click on pic.)

 

 


Healthy Kids Learning Community Webinar Series

HEALTHY KIDS LEARNING COMMUNITY WEBINARS | 2018-19

Healthy Kids Learning Community Facilitated Discussions On the Opioid Crisis in Ohio

One of the immediate missions of the Healthy Kids Learning Community initiative has been to create an accessible, continuing resource for clinicians and caregivers dealing with the surmounting crises and dimensions that has occurred during the Ohio opiate epidemic over the past half decade.

In keeping with this mission, the Center for Innovative Practices, in collaboration with WraparoundOhio.org and the Healthy Kids Learning Community initiative, partnered with some of Ohio’s foremost experts in their respective fields to lend their perspectives via their areas of expertise in a community share for the Buckeye State’s youth, families, clinicians, and various stakeholders dealing with the challenges and recovery of those youth and families.

Below is the five-session series, exploring the various facets of the crisis, notably including various ways to help service provider staff avoid burnout and turnover.


The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families and Children Part 1
Presented by Angela LaRiviere, Director of Youth Move Ohio and Timothy Schaffner, M.Ed., LSWTrustee
Executive Director, Trumbull County Children Services

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Ohio Family and Children First, and with the support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), presents a webinar on “The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families,” exploring the unique impact of parental opiate use on the development of the child and the resulting challenges. Visit Overview Page | View Webinar

Understanding Opioid Addiction
Presented by Michael Fox, LPCC-S, LCDC III
The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Ohio Family and Children First, and with the support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), presents a webinar on “Understanding Opioid Addiction and Pathways to Recovery,” providing an overview opiates, opioids, addiction, and some promising practices toward recovery and reduction of use. The webinar was presented by Michael Fox, LPCC-S, LCDC III, Consultant and Trainer: Center for Innovative Practices. Visit Overview Page| View Webinar


Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline
Presented by Sarah Buffie, CEO, Soul Bird Consulting
The Trauma Informed Biographical Timeline (TIBT) is a trauma informed assessment that helps to put a person’s current situation in context with their life experiences.  It is a way to help see the whole person, not just the case files.  This 37 minute webinar introduce you to the TIBT concepts and provide a brief preview of what to expect at Sarah’s full day training. Visit Overview Page | View Webinar


Urban Zen: Avoiding Burnout in High Stress Work Environments
Presented by Marcia Miller, E-RYT 500
Marcia Miller has been teaching yoga for over 40 years and has taught all levels and types of students from new beginners to yoga teachers and everyone in between. In 2001 Marcia was one of the founders/owners of Yoga on High. She is one of a few Master Teacher Trainers for the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) Trainings and in charge of Reiki training for UZIT. She is on a community advisory board for the Center for Integrative Health and Wellness at the Ohio State University and offers UZIT modalities in Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University. Visit Overview PageView Webinar


The Opioid Crisis and the Impact on Families and Children Part 2
As was covered in Part 1, Ohio, being at the forefront of the opiate crisis, children and families have been impacted by this epidemic at rates unparalleled in modern times. Beyond the immediate impact on children’s well-being, the effects may be more long lasting as abrupt changes in parental attunement can impact patterns of attachment. Also notable, routine interventions may be inadequate to address children and family needs. – The objectives in Part 2 include: Completing the overview of Part 1 on the impact on individual children; providing updates on the current opiate crisis impact on youth, families and child welfare in Ohio; and an overview of interventions on multiple levels including system of care, agencies, programs, individuals and communities. Visit Overview Page | View Webinar


Learn More: Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Click on pic to download PDF)

: 

Also:
The National Child Traumatic Network Visit site | The Child Trauma Academy Visit site | ACE Study Visit site  | Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  Visit site | American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Visit site | The Sanctuary Model Visit site
The Public Children Services Association of Ohio Visit site

Angela Lariviere : Angela.yepdirector@gmail.com
TIM SCHAFFNER email; timothy.schaffner@jfs.ohio.gov


Presented by the Center for Innovative Practices and WraparoundOhio.org in partnership with: (To learn more, click on pic.)


 

 


MRSS

Resource and Review | Two-Day Virtual Conference on Ohio’s Mobile Response Stabilization Services (MRSS)

Two Comprehensive All-Day Sessions | Held September 21st & 22nd, 2021

AS PART OF THE Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) partnership with Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s Children’s Initiative and the Ohio Department of Medicaid, the Center for Innovative Practices (CIP) at Case Western Reserve University’s Begun Center for Violence Prevention hosted a two-day virtual conference on Mobile Response Stabilization Services (MRSS) September 21-22, 2021  The MRSS Virtual Conference was presented in partnership with SAMHSA’S ENGAGE 2.0 and the OhioMHAS.

Learn More about MRSS HERE | Download PDF of Conference Agenda Here

Learn more about and register for Fall MRSS Trainings here.


THE CONFERENCE FEATURED local, regional, state, and national MRSS experts presenting on a wide range of topics. Below are the videos of each individual presentation, each about an hour long. Just click on the picture to view the video.

Also, to view PowerPoint presentations, click for Day 1 and Day 2

DAY 1: Welcome & Opening Remarks, Lori Criss, Director, Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services  | Keynote: “Crisis Response as Community Responsibility,”  Ron Manderscheid. MD | Workshop 1: “Overview of Mobile Response Stabilization Services,”  Richard Shepler, PhD, PCC-S

Day 1 Keynote | Click pic to view video

Workshop 1 | Click pic to view video

Workshop 2 | Click pic to view video

 

 

 

 

 

 


Day 1: Workshop 2: “Medicaid and MRSS + Building and Staffing Your MRSS Team,” Sarah Becker and the Ohio Department of Medicaid’s, Kelly Smith and Marisa Weisel | Workshop 3: “Lessons Learned through Implementing MRSS,Precia Stuby, Mike Bowles, Liz Jensen, and Victoria Taylor 

Workshop 3 | Click pic to view video

Workshop 4 | Click pic to view video

Workshop 5 | Click pic to view video

 

 

 

 

 

 


DAY 2: Keynote: “Small Steps, Big Changes: Taking MRSS to the Next Level,” Chris Morano | Workshop 6: “Peer Support within MRSS Panel,” Margaret Lawrence and Kaylea Dillon | Workshop 7: “Strategies for Rural Counties,” Roberta Donovan and Cathy Krieg

Day 2 Keynote | Click pic to view video

Workshop 6 | Click pic to view video

Workshop 7 | Click pic to view video

 

 

 

 

 

 


Day 2:  Workshop 8: “Collaborating with Key Partners,” Heather Wells, Beth Boyle, Kelly Kennard | Closing: Open Q&A Session  

Workshop 8 | Click pic to view video

Closing Q&A | Click pic view video

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

 


Webinar | Milwaukee County’s Mobile Crisis Response Services (MRSS)

Presented by Chris Morano, PhD

Chris Morano, PhD is the Director of Mobile Emergency Mental Health Services for Milwaukee County Children and families. Dr. Morano has been in the crisis intervention field for nearly 20 years, and runs the largest mobile mental health unit in the country, through Wraparound Milwaukee.

| View Webinar |

Milwaukee County’s Mobile Crisis Response Services were developed over 20 years ago as part of development of Wraparound Milwaukee, the county’s System of Care(SOC) for children with serious emotional and mental health needs.

| View MUTT PowerPoint Presentation |

Named the Mobile Urgent Treatment Team, it began as a service to children in Wraparound with the primary goal to keep youth enrolled in the SOC at home and out of inpatient psychiatric care unless truly needed.

Goal to contain and manage crisis in the home and community so the family plan and vision wouldn’t be disrupted.

| Learn More About Wraparound Milwaukee |

A change in State law in 1996 required all Wisconsin counties to plan for and provide crisis services(HFS34) to children and adults.

| View Chris Morano Alternatives Presentation |

Consistent with HFS34 funding was created under the Wis. State Medicaid Program to cover costs associated with the provision of mobile crisis response and optional stabilization services.

The Mobile Urgent Treatment Team under the organization and direction of Wraparound Milwaukee and Milwaukee County’s Children’s Mental Health Division than evolved to be available to every child in Milwaukee County but also retained it’s “gatekeeper” functions for WAM youth.

An array of Crisis stabilization services permitted under HFS34 began to be developed and funded in Milwaukee county in 2002 including crisis group home and crisis 1:1 stabilizers.

A Contract was entered into in 2005 with Child Welfare for creation of a dedicated foster care crisis team due to excessive placement disruptions and response to federal lawsuit.

Contract with Milw. Public Schools in 2006 for specialized crisis team, grades 6-12, respond to school aggression, suspensions, etec.(ended in 2010 due to loss of state funds).

MUTT/Milw. Police Dept Trauma team developed in 2015 based on Yale Child Studies Model of Police, Mental health partnership.


Ohio Wraparound Training Series Video and Captivate Modules | 13 Sessions

 

Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) Six-Part Training Series


Cultural Humility Training | Working With Latinx Youth and Families and Recovery from Trauma

The Center for Innovative Practices presents a two-part discussion and training entitled, “Working With Latinx Youth and Families and Recovery from Trauma,” with Ramfis L. Marquez, PhD, LPC,, Gisela Diaz, MA, and Francisco J. Cornejo, MSW. The two sessions  guide clinicians and caregivers toward a better understanding of the many Latinx cultures and offers approaches, strategies, and tools for when working with Latinx youth and their families. Topics range from the subtleties and diversity of experiences in the many Latinx cultures to the degrees of generational trauma that uniquely affects these families and communities. 

Click on image for Session 1

THIS TWO-SESSION, SIX-HOUR deep dive into Latinx culture in the United States and the unique challenges presented for behavioral healthcare clinicians and caregivers working with Latinx youth and families is explored in significant detail in a wide-ranging conversation, covering a broad landscape of topics, punctuated with dozens of real-life examples of challenges met and triumphs made along the path of recovery. The collaborative team-approach uses a combination of instruction, intervention, (listen for Uno Therapy in the fifth stanza), and lessons learned. The true-life examples – some amusing, some harrowing, all poignant, if not inspiring – provide a narrative tapestry that connects and engages throughout the  training and makes the daily small victories

VIEW SESSION 1 | VIEW SESSION 2 | DOWNLOAD PDF of PRESENTATION

Click on image for Session 2

Related Resources: English Language Intense Home Behavioral Treatment (IHBT) Crisis Information Template | Spanish Language Crisis Information and Safety Plan Template

Areas covered include: Corporal punishment; the ‘machismo’ ideals and patriarchal family structure; domestic violence within a cultural context; political neglect versus political violence; gangs and MS-13; narco-terrorism and the drug trade; unaccompanied minors and human trafficking; family separation and Immigration; detention centers; Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA); and deportation and raids.

(The majority of the text below is drawn from the presentation.)

“Latinos Are a Multiracial, Multicultural Group”
Latinos/as/ or Hispanics in the United States are a fast growing population, expanding from a small, regionally concentrated group of fewer than 6 million in 1960 to a now widely dispersed population of well more than 50 million (or 16 percent of the nation’s population).

(Click on images to expand and read slides.)

Latinos are a diverse community. There are many misconceptions and stereotypes about who Latinos are and about the history and presence of Latinos in the United States, including the difference between Latinos and Hispanics.

Some Mexican Americans have been in the US for many generations. In fact, most of California and the Southwest was once part of Mexico. New immigrants from South America, Central America, and the Spanish speaking Caribbean continue to be part of the growing presence of Latinos. However, since 2000, the primary source of Latino population growth has swung from immigration to native births.

Latinos are a growing academic, political, and financial force in the US. One-in-four newborns is Latino. Never before in this country’s history has a minority ethnic group made up so large a share of the youngest Americans. By force of numbers alone,
the kinds of adults these young Latinos become will help shape the kind of society America becomes in the 21st century.

(Click on image to expand and read slide.)

Diversity within Latin America
Spanish is the official language spoken throughout most of Latin America, but not all Latinos/as speak Spanish. Latinos are a multiracial, multicultural group. Latinos include indigenous people who speak their own native tongues (e.g. Quechua a Native South American language family spoken primarily in the Andes, derived from a common ancestral language). English, French, and Portuguese are also spoke in specific Countries of Latin America an the Caribbean (e.g. Haiti, Brazil, Jamaica).

The prevalence of mental health problems vary among Latino subgroups and
are a reflection of the diversity of experiences and circumstances. Given the tremendous amount of diversity that exists among Latino/Hispanic individuals, it is important to understand the impact that this diversity has on what we understand regarding Latinos seeking or needing treatment. (See PDF section on Differences in Experiences by Region for more detailed descriptions.)

Latino Family System Dynamics
Latino culture is known for its collectivist-family orientation. the importance of “personalismo” (personal connectedness in interactions) and respect for authority. As Latinos reside longer in the U.S. they lose some of the potentially protective effects of their culture.

An increase in rates of psychiatric disorders and suicide is seen with increasing acculturation or assimilation into American culture.

Being bicultural and bilingual is actually protective for youth both academically and for mental health. Being able to communicate in the language of both worlds maximizes the child’s capacity to draw upon available protective resources while at the same time it enables an adaptive response to the language demand. Non-linguistic aspects of bicultural competence in the child, family and extended social environment have an important protective role in Latino children of immigrants and minimize their distress.

The growing Latinx community in the United States hails from a panoramic landscape of different cultures, obstacles, and journeys: Caribbean, Mexican, Central American and South American cultures are all distinct, distinguished by numerous factors from landscape and geo-political and socio-economic factors to religions and individual family heritage and customs.

(Click on image to expand and read slide.)

Trauma and the Latinx Community
Recent Latinx immigrants are at risk for traumatic exposure both before and after migration, PTSD, depression and stress associated with the immigration experience and the challenges of integration versus marginalization in the US.

Individuals who come from countries with a history of political violence often have multiple traumatic experiences. This suggests a need for systematic screening for trauma and related psychiatric disorders in these populations.

Specific outreach interventions focused on perceptions of need could be helpful for subgroups of Latinos including men who are particularly underrepresented in mental health services but who exhibit significant trauma histories.

Youth from the growing Central American exodus (aka, unaccompanied refugee minors) have high rates of traumatic exposure, PTSD and anxiety. Additionally, US citizen children of undocumented parents are also at risk of anxiety given their parents tenuous legal status and the fear of deportation

A Few Best Practices for Working with Latinx Individuals
Some interventions that have proven useful include: The use of a bio-psycho-social-cultural model of evaluation and treatment. Take the time to develop a cultural formulation, which includes a consideration for acculturation, community and family connection, immigration status/ history, education. Supporting collaborative care with Latinos is important for retention and success of care. Although this is a culture that respects authority, feeling misunderstood and not connected to a therapist often results in dropping out from treatment

(Click on image to expand and read slide.)

Rapport building is also key to engagement and family buy in. Latinx families are likely to be averse to engaging in services or expect “quick-fixes” to the issues they face. Psychoeducation combined with an openness to discuss treatment plans can aid in family engagement. Discuss ways in which the family or client has (or has not) begun engaging in social support and self-care. Focus on education and work may leave individuals reluctant to engage in self-care or social practices.

Beware of misunderstanding of mindfulness and yoga related practices within Latinx community which may be interpreted as spiritual practices. This may result in reluctance to begin meditative and mindfulness practices.

Keys to Engagement (Youth, Family, Extended Family)
Latinx youth will engage much like other youth but language barriers can stifle progress. Make use of art, music and play to build rapport. Its important to also ensure that the children are being properly engaged in school and are receiving ESOL services.

Latinx families are typically collective in nature. The nuclear family are typically extended to include what would be considered extended family members in American culture (Uncles, Aunts,Grandparents, etc.). These family members can be integral at not only building rapport but providing important context and information on family dynamics and things that may be impacting the client.

Safety Planning With Spanish Speaking Families
Mental Health treatment stigma and religion plays a role in the reporting and addressing of suicidal ideation (SI) within the Latinx community. Adults may be less likely to report SI out of fear of judgement from others in the
community and their family. Shame and religious ideologies may also hinder
discussion on SI in the therapeutic setting.

(Click on image to expand and read slide.)

Children may struggle with many similar reservations about discussing SI with the
resulting shame leading to lack of communication with parents and family. Revelations of SI should be handled with care to prevent adding to the shame felt by the individual.

Caution should also be had when presenting to parents a child’s communication of SI as
there is a potential for them to react in shock and anger. Options should be given to
the children as to how their parents will be presented with the necessary information.
Parents should be reassured using psychoeducation on SI and by presenting ways to
be supportive of their child.

The Family Teaming Model
As a provider, your first goal is that your client does not need you anymore. Clinical Supports versus Natural Supports consists of involving everyone who is interested in the safety and wellbeing of the child. Care providers should be the positive force behind the client and the family, meeting regularly with people who want to support the client. A primary goal is to become the clinical facilitator and an expert on the needs of the client and the family, as well as an advocate for the client and family. Care providers will want to facilitate discussion, yet always leave the table with a plan, ensuring everyone is working out of the same plan of care. Finally, it is helpful to start planning the discharge at the onset of treatment and, eventually before discharging, ensure that the client has the support that they need.

Treatment Planning with Hispanics
As a care provider working with Latinx youth and their families, communities, and support networks it is helpful to keep in mind the following facets a intervention and treatment, and the nuance and subtleties that might impact effective recovery.
– Build Confianza (Trust)
– Familism
– Machismo versus patriarchal versus matriarchal culture
– Inclusion of Spirituality
– Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Mental Health
– Continued exploration of family Secret
– Education on alternative styles to parenting
– Education on alternative styles to discipline
– The Spanish Language (interpreters, first language providers)
– Somatization
– Inclusion of cultural activities
– Idioms of distress
– Perceived Cultural mismatch


ABOUT THE PRESENTERS

Ramfis L. Marquez, PhD, LPC, is the Director of the Behavioral Health Department. He holds a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology and is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of Virginia. Dr. Marquez studied at Walden University and Inter American University of Puerto Rico and has worked in the field of mental health for 17 plus years. He has specialized experience working with Children, Adults, Geriatrics, Individual, Couples and Families in both English and Spanish. Dr. Marquez has developed expertise in the areas of Trauma, ADHD, Asperger’s Disorder (Autism Level 1), Depression, Anxiety and other DSM disorders. Dr. Marquez approaches therapy from a holistic perspective, using techniques from client focused, humanistic, motivational and reality based therapies. In his free time, Dr. Marquez enjoys reading, music, history, stand up paddle boarding, cooking, dancing, playing the guitar, sports cars, martial arts and Science Fiction. Learn More

Gisela Diaz, MA, has worked for over three decades with the Latinx communities in a variety of settings while living in her native Puerto Rico, and later in an externship in La Habana, Cuba. Gisela and her husband Dr. Marquez relocated to the Wahington DC Metropolitan area in late 2000 where she continued her work in the field of mental health and community services in Washington DC and Virginia. Gisela holds a Master’s Degree in School Psychology. She has practiced in the state of Virginia as a Bilingual School Psychologist for the past 18 years. She has worked for decades with Latinx communities in various realms of advocacy, academics, health, the criminal justice system, and the field of social services. She strongly believes in working collaboratively with her student’s families, teachers, and support systems, while providing guidance while respecting each individual journey. Most recently after Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, Gisela founded Voice of Puerto Rico a platform that gives voice to the people of her island through advocacy, and community support. Gisela also volunteers often in her community with issues associated with immigration, hunger, and advocacy for equal access to education, and health services. She is the mother of two young adults, enjoys crafting, and working with her soon to be a therapy dog, Athena.

Francisco Javier Cornejo MSW, completed his BS in Psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University and continued his education at George Mason University, as he pursued a Master’s degree in Social Work. Francisco has focused his work on trauma and recovery within the Latinx and migrant community by delivering behavioral health services in community health centers located in Prince William County. Francisco additionally has worked to increase the participation and collaboration among various community entities to aid in increasing access to necessary resources for the Latinx community.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Latinx Therapy:
Website and Podcast has various supplemental resources on MH topics. Podcast is recorded in English and Spanish. Visit site

Washburn Center
Translation and definition of various MH related terms to be used with and to aid in explain to a Latinx population. Our mission is to nurture every child and family’s well-being and full potential through transformative children’s mental health care. Visit site

Therapist Aid
Creates and shares worksheets on different modalities that have been translated into Spanish along with videos, guides, and other tools to aid mental health professionals in the course of their work. Visit site

Informed Immigrant
Provides resources for clients and providers on mental health services and complexity of immigrant experience and mental health issues Visit site

Suicide Prevention Resource Center
Information on suicide prevention within the Latinx community. Visit site


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WrapaoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-5235 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2020 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CIP New Initiatives Supervisors Overview September 2021

Co-Directors Bobbi Beale, PsyD and Richard Shepler, PhD discuss new initiatives happening with the The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP) at Case Western Reserve University’s Begun Center for Violence Prevention and the impact on Ohio’s at-risk youth in recovery. The one-hour discussion session held with clinical supervisors from throughout Ohio’s mental health and recovery provider community addresses the state’s evolving Medicaid guidelines, how to meet the challenges of staffing, and the various ways the CIP is helping communities and organizations navigate the changes and make the most of the new possibilities these initiatives bring.

Download Decision Tree for IHBT WA ICT MST FFT and MRSS 9.21 here | WA IHBT MRSS Comparison Grid here

 



WraparoundOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-6293 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

 

CIP Innovative Conversations Provides Intensive Home-Based Treatment Overview | A Four-Part Series

Counterclockwise, from the top: Patrick Kanary, Former Director and Founder of the Center for Innovative Practices; Judge Linda Tucci Teodosio, formerly of the Summit County Juvenile Court; Gabriella Celeste, Policy Director, Schubert Center for Child Studies, CWRU; Michael Fox, Integrated Co-occurring Treatment Trainer/Consultant, Center for Innovative Practices/Begun Center, CWRU; Jeff Kretschmar, Research Associate Professor, Begun Center, CWRU.

The Center for Innovative Practices (CIP), part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, has developed a podcast initiative entitled, Innovative Conversations, exploring topics pertaining to the CIP mission of identifying promising practices and evidence-based interventions for youth dealing with mental health, substance use, trauma, and judicial justice challenges.

Hosted by first CIP director Patrick Kanary, the series also examines how Wraparound Systems of Care can better facilitate how integrated treatment can help yield optimal outcomes with youth recovery.

The sessions begin with a historical perspective of the Evolution of the Systems of Care Approach, progresses to Trauma and Trauma Informed Care in a System of Care Approach,

The series then explores, The Impact of Generational Trauma and Promising Practices in Multiple Systems of Care, concluding with a round-table discussion with a panel of Ohio’s leading experts, Systems of Care, Behavioral Health, and Juvenile Justice: Multiple Perspectives.

The four-part series can be found below.


Session 1  | Evolution of the Systems of Care Approach
Click here to learn more | Click here to listen
Beth Stroul provides an overview and history of Systems of Care, a spectrum of effective, community-based services and supports for children and youth with or at risk for behavioral health or other challenges and their families, that is organized into a coordinated network, builds meaningful partnerships with families and youth, and addresses their cultural and linguistic needs, in order to help them to function better at home, in school, in the community, and throughout life..


Session 2  | Trauma and Trauma Informed Care in a System of Care Approach
Click here to learn more | Click here to listen
Trauma can range from things that make you feel like you’re going to die – very dangerous and serious aggressive behaviors, assault and all sorts of abuse – to what we will call traumatic stress, ongoing pressure, unrelenting and woven into their lives that include poverty, discrimination and bullying. These are all things that threaten you in one way or another, but ultimately you feel that you cannot escape them. Trauma-Informed Care is applying your knowledge of trauma to your field, to your practice to your organization..


Session 3 | The Impact of Generational Trauma and Promising Practices in Multiple Systems of Care
Click here to learn more | Click here to listen
The FITT Model recognizes and aims to address the impact of traumatic events and contextual stressors on every member of the family, on family relationships, and on the family as a whole. The FITT Model, anchored in family and trauma-informed principles and practices, provides the framework for an ecological family systems approach that strengthens families’ efforts to attain safety and stability as they plot a course to address their unique needs. The FITT model infuses a trauma-specific family systems approach to assessment, intervention and treatment.


Session 4 | Systems of Care, Behavioral Health, and Juvenile Justice: Multiple Perspectives
Click here to learn more | Click here to listen
According to recent data, about 75% of youth involved in the juvenile justice system have experienced traumatic victimization, a significant factor that Ohio’s systems – among the pioneering leaders in effective, fidelity-based juvenile justice interventions, are just beginning to grapple with in new ways in terms of both policy and practice. This podcast provides insight and information related to youth with behavioral health conditions and their involvement in the juvenile justice system and what areas of improvement are needed.  The discussion addresses this issue from multiple perspectives..


IHBTOhio.org is presented by The Center for Innovative Practices | Part of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention
at Case Western Reserve University’s Mandel School of Applied Social Services
Campus Location: 11235 Bellflower Road Room 375  | Cleveland, OH 44106
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue | Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
Telephone: 216-368-5235 | email: pxm6@case.edu
© 2019 Center for Innovative Practices, Cleveland, Ohio 44106