Behavioral Health and Juvenile Justice: Multiple Perspectives

Innovative Conversations Session 4 | Behavioral Health and Innovative Conversations:  Juvenile Justice: Multiple Perspectives
Guests: Gabriella Celeste, Policy Director, Schubert Center for Child Studies, CWRU; Michael Fox, Integrated Co-occurring Treatment Trainer/Consultant, Center for Innovative Practices/Begun Center, CWRU; Jeff Kretschmar, Research Associate Professor, Begun Center, CWRU; Judge Linda Tucci Teodosio, Summit County Juvenile Court

| Download Session 4 Takeaway Points |

LISTEN BELOW to Behavioral Health and Juvenile Justice: Multiple Perspectives

This podcast provides insight and information related to youth with behavioral health conditions and their involvement in the juvenile justice system and what areas of improvement are needed.  The discussion addresses this issue from multiple perspectives.

Some things to keep in mind: According to recent data, about 75% of youth involved in the juvenile justice system have experienced traumatic victimization, a significant factor that Ohio’s systems – among the pioneering leaders in effective, fidelity-based juvenile justice interventions, are just beginning to grapple with in new ways in terms of both policy and practice.

Moreover, we also know that youth in juvenile placement have nearly three times the risk for suicide as youth in the general population of community interventions and treatments.

(Click on pic to see full PDF)

Panel:
HOST: Patrick Kanary, Former Director and Founder of the Center for Innovative Practices
•    Gabriella Celeste, Policy Director, Schubert Center for Child Studies, CWRU
•    Michael Fox, Integrated Co-occurring Treatment Trainer/Consultant, Center for Innovative Practices/Begun Center, CWRU
•    Jeff Kretschmar, Research Associate Professor, Begun Center, CWRU
•    Judge Linda Tucci Teodosio, Summit County Juvenile Court

The goals of the podcast are twofold:
1) education/information;
2) ‘What’s’ next or what still needs to be done’ across each of the content areas outlined below.
•    JJ system in Ohio
•    Reform / advocacy efforts
•    Research, data and profile on youth incarcerated/justice involved and with BH needs
•    Effective practices for youth involved in JJ

(Click on pic to see full PDF)

Juvenile Justice System Issues (Judge Teodosio):
•    What happens to youth with behavioral health conditions when they touch the JJ system? Do you have a sense of what percentage of the youth you see meet this criteria?
•    What programs or resources does the Court bring?
•    How does the system balance accountability for actions with recognition of behavioral and developmental issues?
•    Where do we go from here? What could further improve the system?

Learn More about Trauma Informed Care | Cultural Competency

Clinical Issues (Michael Fox)
•    What are some effective interventions that courts and communities are using with success?
•    What treatment approaches need wider dissemination?
•    Where do we go from here? What are the gaps in treatment and support that are still needed?

(Click on pic to see full PDF)

Research and Data (Jeff Kretschmar Ph.D)

•    From the BHJJ initiative, what do we know about the youth involved with the JJ system who have BH needs?
•    What is the outcome data telling us about ‘what’s working’ within these local projects?
•    How has the research and data been used to promote change at the local and state levels?
•    Where do we go from here? What areas of research that still are needed?

Advocacy and Reform Issues (Gabriella Celeste)
•    How has Ohio’s JJ system improved over the last 5 years or so?
•    What policies and practices are in place to support the needs of these youth?
•    How is the system addressing the disproportionate representation of these youth?
•    Where do we go from here? What reform efforts still need pursuing?


The Honorable Linda Teodosio | Summit County (Ohio) Juvenile Court Judge

“USED TO BE
: The juvenile justice system was a place where people looked for children to be locked up and teach them a lesson, thus to get them on the right path.

“NOW: We know that if a child is dealing with a chemical dependency, a significant mental health disorder or has suffered significant trauma, simply placing them in detention certainly isn’t going to ‘correct’ their behavior; as a matter of fact, with certain types of trauma and mental health disorders, placement in a confined space with other youth will actually aggravate and make their mental health disorder worse.”