ARTICLES (Comprehensive)


Rethinking Wraparound: Proposing a New Construct to Support an Evolving Understanding of the Wraparound Approach

The goal of this article is not to describe a specific version of what Wraparound practice should be – as if there was only one answer to that question, but rather to propose a new construct to help Wraparound practitioners hone their approaches and improve the impact of their efforts to assist families. The goal of this article is not to describe a specific version of what Wraparound practice should be–as if there was only one answer to that question, but rather to propose a new construct to help Wraparound practitioners hone their approaches and improve the impact of their efforts to assist families.

There is no Wraparound bible. Wrap does have a sort of Ten Commandments in the form of its core values, but they don’t describe a specific practice model, only what every model should strive to achieve.1In fact, even with the range of usual and customary values lists, communities make a range of choices about what values are highlighted. The values list associated with Wraparound has been as high as 25 statements.Wraparound does have a Canon, a collection of stories and articles, training manuals and statutes, contracts and evaluations that have been accumulating in nearly every state and province in North America over the four decades since the foundational programs on which modern Wraparound practice is based first began operation. Read Full Article


The Needs Guide: A resource for families, facilitators and team members working with the Wraparound process

Wraparound is a complex process when you put all of the pieces together. Each of the core concepts of Wraparound can be hard to implement. For example, getting a team together to come up with a single plan of care is easier said than done. Staying focused on strengths while struggling with the behavior of a teenager can be a challenge for any Wraparound team. Staying focused on a common outcome can also be challenging. Despite these challenges most individuals associated with Wraparound find that they can manage if not master core Wraparound concepts such as Team, Plan of Care, Strengths or Outcomes. The most difficult Wraparound concept is that of Needs. This Workbook is designed to help all individuals who are working with Wraparound to become comfortable with the concept of needs as used in the Wraparound process. It is also designed to help individuals and teams work better at identifying the underlying needs, reaching agreement about the most important need and staying focused on addressing and meeting those needs.Wraparound is designed to address needs. In Wraparound, Needs should not be defined as something required, something sought, as an obligation or as steps towards accomplishing a goal. Instead, Needs are defined as underlying conditions or causes. Needs are essential and unbounded and reflect the basic humanness in all of us. If left untended, needs that are unmet will create a gap, tear or void in a person’s life. When such a void occurs, behaviors often arise that communicate the unmet need. Unfortunately when such behaviors arise, systems and services are often focused at managing the behavior rather than meeting the need. If the need continues to go unmet, the behavior is likely to escalate resulting in more attempts to contain the behavior. Read Full Article


Benchmarking in Wraparound

Benchmarking is aimed to find the easiest counts for success; engage in bi-level benchmarking; manage the initial conditions that got the family referred; engage the family in identifying benchmarks that create meaning in each day; manage to the facts; summarize to the positives; bring information to the team for review; use logic in reviewing benchmarks at a team level; and builds discipline for team decision making rather than crowd decision making. The emergent view of the stages of Wraparound involve: Focus on the family’s experience of Wraparoun; moving away from a product view (compliance) to an outcome focused (impact); an emphasis on one success building upon another; timing that is focused on family’s experience versus funding structures; a requirement for multiple opportunities for family input to drive design; and the transition from a rigid process to fluid process. Some things to also consider: Framework changes from focus on provider to focus on family wherein poviders. In addition, framework changes to task completion to results orientation. Framework also changes from a focus on practice compliance to a focus on results for families. And, framework changes from a focus on leaving wraparound when it’s time to producing enough hope through wraparound.  View Presentation.

Summary of HIPAA and Federal Drug and Alcohol Confidentiality Law

hippa-logoThe following is a brief summary of the research conducted by Michelle L. Riske-Morris, PhD, JD on the Federal Drug and Alcohol Confidentiality Law (42 CFR Part 2) and (HIPAA). There is also included a brief summary of the Federal Education Reporting Privacy Act (FERPA).  This overview is cursory and only meant to provide a brief overview.  The nuances and intricacies of these laws can be quite confusing.  The issue researched was how these two laws affect information shared during a case management conference.  Specifically what information can be shared by therapists and practitioners during these types of meetings and whether there were any restrictions or constraints which may impede open discourse?  Understanding these laws will help to avoid inappropriate use of information and minimize potential negative collateral consequences of information sharing. While information sharing is optimal during a case management conference to ensure coordinated case plans for the youth and families who are served by multiple agencies to improve outcomes for these individuals, nevertheless there are restrictions in how and what confidential information can be disclosed. If there is improper disclosure, the individual and/or organization could face fines and penalties ranging from $500 to $50,000 for the first offense.  Unauthorized disclosure violates the individual’s due process rights. This summary assumes that the client is a youth; therefore, additional considerations are discussed involving the role and influence of parents and guardians. | Read Complete Article |

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process
http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/PhaseActivWAProcess.pdf
“Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process” focuses on what needs to happen in wraparound; however, how the work is accomplished is equally important. Merely accomplishing the tasks is insufficient unless this work is done in a manner consistent with the 10 principles of wraparound. In addition, future work from the National Wraparound Initiative will provide more detailed information about team member skills that are necessary for the wraparound process, as well as descriptions of specific procedures, templates, and other tools that can be used to complete the activities described.

Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health

his Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health addresses the prevalence of alcohol, illicit drugs, and prescription drug misuse in the United States. Chapters of the report cover neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, health systems integration, and recommendations for the future. To download full report, click on picture The first-ever Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol,… Read more »

Ohio Drug Overdose Data: 2016 General Findings

Fentanyl and Related Drugs Like Carfentanil as well as Cocaine Drove Increase in Overdose DeathsOhio’s opioid epidemic continued to evolve in 2016 to stronger drugs, driving an increase in unintentional overdose deaths. The data shows a significant increase in overdose deaths involving the opioid fentanyl, the emergence of more powerful fentanyl-related drugs like carfentanil, and… Read more »

Quick Guide for Self-Assessment for Family-Run Organizations in Systems of Care

Quick Guide for Self-Assessment for Family-Run Organizations in Systems of Care http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/rtcpubs/FamExp/Familyquickguide.pdf The Quick Guide is for use by family-run organizations. The guide is divided into nine sections addressing important elements of family-run organization development and sustainability. Each section represents several components or characteristics of effective family-run organizations in a system of care. A brief… Read more »

Effective Financing Strategies

Effective Financing Strategies http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Effective-Financing-Strategies-Sheila-Pires.pdf The Research and Training Center for Children’s Mental Health (RTC) at the University of South Florida conducted several five-year studies to identify critical implementation factors that support states, communities, tribes, and territories in their efforts to build effective systems of care to serve children and adolescents with or at risk for… Read more »

Strategic Sharing Workbook

Strategic Sharing Workbook http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/pbStrategicSharingGuide.pdf This workbook is for individuals who have experienced traumatic life experiences and are interested in sharing their stories in an effort to promote change. Training in Strategic Sharing is an important part of advocacy – we encourage anyone who has experienced traumatic life events and wishes to share those experiences in… Read more »

Best Practices for Achieving Meaningful Youth Participation

Best Practices for Achieving Meaningful Youth Participation http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/pbAMPYouthParticipation.pdf Human service and educational agencies and systems often convene teams to work collaboratively on plans for serving children or youth. This is particularly true for children and youth who are involved with multiple systems or who are felt to be in need of intensive intervention. These kinds… Read more »

Paving the Way

Paving the Way http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Paving-the-Way.pdf This position paper was written to help build consensus around the issues and solutions for transition-age youth served by the mental health system in Ohio. This consensus building process will generate an action plan to support seamless treatment and support services and improved outcomes for transition-age youth. The information provided in… Read more »

Whose Idea Is This A Parent’s Guide to Individuals with Disabilities

Whose Idea Is This A Parent’s Guide to Individuals with Disabilities http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Whose-IDEA.pdf If you are a parent of a child who has a disability that interferes with his or her education, or if your child is suspected of having such a disability, this handbook will serve as a valuable resource for your child’s education. Whose… Read more »

The Wraparound Process User’s Guide

The Wraparound Process User’s Guide http://wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Wraparound_Family_Guide09-2010.pdf This step-by-step tutorial provides an overview of the Wraparound System of Care as well as implementation guidelines that are at the heart of Ohio’s SAMHSA System of Care Expansion initiative seeking to expand System of Care statewide focusing on youth, young adults in transition, their care givers and families…. Read more »

How and Why Does Wraparound Work | A Theory of Change

How and Why Does Wraparound Work | A Theory of Change http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/HowAndWhyDoesWraparoundWork.pdf Wraparound has always had implicit associations with various psychosocial theories, however, until recently only preliminary efforts had been undertaken to explain in a thorough manner why the wraparound process should produce desired outcomes. The Wraparound theory assumes that, when wraparound is undertaken in… Read more »

Ten Principles of the Wraparound Process

Ten Principles of the Wraparound Process http://wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/TenPrincWAProcess.pdf The philosophical principles of wraparound have long provided the basis for understanding this innovative and widely-practiced service delivery model. This value base for working in collaboration and partnership with families extends from wraparound’s roots in programs such as Kaleidoscope in Chicago, the Alaska Youth Initiative, and Project Wraparound… Read more »

Achieve My Plan | Youth Participation Research Summary

Achieve My Plan | Youth Participation Research Summary http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/AMP-AchieveMyPlanYouthParticipationResearchSummary123010.pdf Human service and educational agencies often convene teams to work collaboratively on plans for serving children or youth. This happens most often for children and youth who are involved with multiple systems or who are felt to be in need of intensive support. Often, these are… Read more »

TIP Model Definition & Guidelines

TIP Model Definition & Guidelines http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/DefineGuidelinesBRIEFORIENTATIONWORKSHOPHandoutPDF122612.pdf The Transition to Independence Process (TIP) model was developed for working with youth and young adults (14-29 years old) with emotional/behavioral difficulties (EBD) to engage them in their own futures planning process and provide them with developmentally-appropriate, non stigmatizing, culturally-competent, trauma-informed, and appealing services and supports. The TIP model… Read more »

Does Team-Based Planning ‘Work’ for Adolescents? | Studies of Wraparound

Does Team-Based Planning ‘Work’ for Adolescents? | Studies of Wraparound http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/WraparoundRESEARCHJanetWalkerAMPAchieveMyPlanJanetWalker052412.pdf This article focuses on wraparound as an example of a team planning process, and uses data from several sources to reflect on questions about whether-and under what conditions-collaborative teams are successful in engaging young people-and their caregivers-in planning. We used data collected in three… Read more »

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process

Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/PhaseActivWAProcess.pdf “Phases and Activities of the Wraparound Process” focuses on what needs to happen in wraparound; however, how the work is accomplished is equally important. Merely accomplishing the tasks is insufficient unless this work is done in a manner consistent with the 10 principles of wraparound. In addition,… Read more »

Building Systems of Care Primer

Building Systems of Care Primer http://www.wraparoundohio.org/wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Building-Systems-of-Care-Primer.pdf Building systems of care is inherently a strategic process. Webster’s Dictionary defines strategic planning as “the science and art of mobilizing all forces—political, economic, financial, psychological—to obtain goals and objectives.” This terminology comes out of warfare! It assumes that there is clarity about goals and objectives. Creating that clarity… Read more »

Strengthening Family Support for Young People with Mental Health Needs in the Transition to Adulthood: A Tip Sheet for Service Provider

Strengthening Family Support for Young People with Mental Health Needs in the Transition to Adulthood: A Tip Sheet for Service Provider http://wraparoundohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/projPTTC-FamilySupportTipSheet-1.pdf To strengthen family support in the transition to adulthood,service providers need to be able to: Consider the experiences reported by many families during the transition years: A shared sense of losing control with… Read more »